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    Usuario Avatar de Nettus
    Fecha de ingreso
    01 feb, 08
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    Predeterminado Kilkenny

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    14. Condado: Kilkenny - Capital: Kilkenny
    Province: Leinster - Area: 2,061 km2 -Population: ~ 90.000 - www.kilkennycoco.ie

    Ballyhale - Ballyragget - Bennettsbridge - Callan - Castlecomer - Fiddown -
    Freshford - Glenmore - Goresbridge - Gowran - Graiguenamanagh - Inistioge
    Johnstown - Kells - Kilkenny - Kilree - Knocktopher - Maddockstown - Mooncoin
    Mullinavat - Piltown - Slieveroe - Thomastown - Tullaroan - Urlingford

    El Condado de Kilkenny (Cill Chainnigh en irlandés) se sitúa al sureste de Irlanda, en la provincia de Leinster. Lleva su nombre por Kilkenny, la ciudad más importante de la región. Uno de los acontecimientos más afamados del lugar, ocurrió durante la rebelión irlandesa de 1641, a modo de hacer frente a la reconquista del país por parte de los ingleses o escoceses, los nobles irlandeses comprometieron sus fuerzas y crearon la confederación de irlandeses católicos.
    Se conoce a los habitantes de Kilkenny como "gatos" ("Kilkenny Cats"); expresión que también se utiliza para aludir al equipo de hurling de Kilkenny, uno de los más fuertes del país.
    Kilkenny ha aumentado mucho en cuanto a población y tecnología en los últimos años gracias a que cada día es más visitada, sobre todo por las noches, por gente de Dublín que necesita salir de la gran ciudad.
    The county takes its name from the city of Kilkenny and has borders with the counties of Laois, Carlow, Wexford, Waterford and Tipperary.
    The River Nore flows through the county and the River Suir forms the border with County Waterford. Brandon Hill is the highest point with an Elevation of 515 m.
    The current county formed part of the Kingdom of Osraige and ecclesiastical Diocese of Ossory.
    History
    County Kilkenny takes its name from the county capital the city of Kilkenny. Kilkenny, retains the the anglicised version of the Irish Cill Chainnigh, which translates as Church of Cainneach or Canice. This most probability relating the church and round tower, now St. Canice's Cathedral, which was built in honor to St. Canice.
    A Neolithic house was identifed in Granny near Waterford, making it the oldest house in County Kilkenny. The square house consisted of slot-trenches, internal floor surfaces, a hearth and wooden posts at each corner, one of the post-holes was radiocarbon-dated to 3997-3728 BC. A new form of early neolithic pottery with a lip around the inside of the rim were found. This Granny pottery is is similar to pottery found in the south-east of England.
    Three qualities of County Kilkenny are said to be; ground without bog, fire without smoke, land without coast.
    These references are to the small amount of bogland, the anthracite coal from Castlecomer and the minimal exposure of the county to salt water.
    County Kilkenny formed part of the Kingdom of Osraige, which existed from at least the 2nd century until the 13th century A.D. The current ecclesiasticaldioceses of that area is still known as Ossory however the original kingdom was bounded by two of the Three Sisters the rivers Barrow and Suir and the northern limit was, generally, the Slieve Bloom Mountains.
    With the arrival of Christianity in Kilkenny many monasteries were built.
    Geography
    The county located in the south-west of Leinster and is bordered by Laois, Carlow, Wexford, Waterford and Tipperary.
    The county contains the city of Kilkenny, located at the center of the county, and the towns of Ballyragget, Callan, Castlecomer, Graiguenamanagh to the north of the county and , Mooncoin and Thomastown to the south.
    County Kilkenny contains two major rivers the River Nore and the River Suir. The River Nore flows through Ballyragget, Kilkenny City and the villages of Bennettsbridge, Thomastown and Inistioge. The River Suir forms the border between County Waterford and County Kilkenny.
    Brandon Hill is the highest point in the county with an Elevation of 515 m (1,690 ft).
    Environment
    Protected areas
    Fiddown Island is 62.6 (ha.) a Nature Reserve established in 1988. It consists of a long narrow island of marsh/woodland on the River Suir. It is covered in willow scrub and bordered by reed swamps - the only known site of its type in Ireland.
    In 2005 Coan Bogs was defined as a Natural Heritage Area under section 18 of the Wildlife Act 2000. The blanket bog consists of two small areas of upland blanket bog located near Castlecomer in the townlands of Coan East and Smithstown. Bedrock geology for both areas is shale overlain locally by glacial till and blanket bog vegetation is well developed.
    Other Special Areas of Conservation include Hugginstown Fen south-west of Ballyhale, The Loughans near Urlingford, Cullahill Mountain on the Castlecomer plateau near Johnstown, Spahill Hill And Clomantagh Hill which forms part of an escarpment which links the Slieve Ardagh Hills with the Castlecomer Plateau,, Galmoy Fen north of Johnstown, Lower River Suir south of Thurles, the freshwater stretches of the Barrow/River Nore and Thomastown Quarry.
    Gardens in County Kilkenny include Kilfane Glen in Thomastown, Woodstock Garden in Inistioge, the Discover Park in Castlecomer, Darver House garden in Jenkinstown, Coolcashin Garden near Johnstown, Emoclew Garden in Goresbridge, Shankill Gardens & Castle in Paulstown, Rothe Family Garden in Kilkenny, Dahlia garden in The Rower and the rose garden at Kilkenny Castle.
    Wildlife
    Flora
    Flora in County Kilkenny includes the endangered Autumn Crocus as well as rare species such as the Bog Orchid, the Killarney Fern and the Tufted Salt-marsh Grass. There are also vulnerable species like Lesser Snapdragon, Meadow Barley, Small-white Orchid, Opposite-leaved Pondweed, Betony, Red Hemp Nettle, Narrow-leaved Helleborine, Lanceolate Spleenwort, Annual Knawel and Basil Thyme
    Fauna
    Fauna in County Kilkenny includes Hedgehogs, Otters, Leisler's bats, Daubenton's bat , the Brown long-eared bat and the Common Pipistrelle. There is also Sika deer, Fallow deer, Stoat , Red Squirrel and Pygmy Shrew.

    Johnstown
    Villages and Towns
    Ballyhale - Ballyragget - Bennetsbridge - Callan - Carigeen - Castlecomer - Castlewarren - Flagmount - Freshford - Galmoy, Goresbridge, Gowran, Graiguenamanagh - Inistioge - Jenkinstown, Johnstown, Johnswell - Kilkenny, Killinaspick, Kilmacow, Kilmoganny, Knocktopher - Mooncoin, Mullinavat
    Paulstown, Piltown - Redhouse - Slieverue, Stoneyford - Thomastown, Tullaroan - Urlingford - Windgap
    Baronies
    The county is also divided into subdivisions called baronies, which are made up of a number of parishes or parts of parishes. Both civil parishes and baronies are now largely obsolete (except for some purposes such as legal transactions involving land) and are no longer used for local government purposes.
    Baronies in County Kilkenny: Callan - - Crannagh - Fassadinin - Galmoy - Gowran - Ida - Iverk - Kells - Kilculliheen
    Kilkenny City - Knocktopher - Shillelogher.
    The civil parishes are divided into townlands.
    From the 17th to mid-19th centuries civil parishes were based on early Christian and medieval monastic and church settlements. As the population grew, new parishes were created and the civil parish covered the same area as the established Church of Ireland. The Roman Catholic Church adapted to a new structure based on towns and villages. There 2,508 civil parishes in Ireland, which frequently break both barony and county boundaries.
    Landmarks
    Architecture
    Round tower
    One feature not usually found outside Ireland is the round tower, such as that at St. Canice's Cathedral in Kilkenny. They were possibly defensive in nature, serving as lookout posts and a place of refuge during an attack (the door to such structures was usually quite high off the ground). Viking raids on Ireland's shores and monasteries were relatively common. There are round towers situated around the county in Tullaherin round tower, near Bennettsbridge, Kilree near Kells, Fertagh near Johnstown and Aghaviller near Knocktopher.
    Castles
    Kilkenny Castle is a castle in Kilkenny. It was the seat of the Butler family. Formerly the family name was FitzWalter. The castle was sold to the local Castle Restoration Committee in the middle of the 20th century for £50. Shortly afterwards it was handed over to the State, and has since been refurbished and is open to visitors. Part of the National Art Gallery is on display in the castle. There are ornamental gardens on the city side of the castle, and extensive land and gardens to the front. It has become one of the most visited tourist sites in Ireland.
    Foulksrath Castle is a 15th century Anglo-Normantower house located in Jenkinstown in County Kilkenny. It was built by the Purcell clan, who also constructed several others nearby. After over three centuries as owners, the family was reduced to living as peasants in the castle stables after it was confiscated by Oliver Cromwell and given to his officers after the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland.
    Churches
    In Medieval Ireland many fine churches in Ireland were also built during this time, such as St. Canice's Cathedral in Kilkenny and St. Mary's Cathedral.
    St. Lachtain's Church, Freshford was built in 1731, incorporating a portal from 1100 as its main entrance, all that is left of the original church is the beautiful Hiberno-Romanesque (Irish-Roman) architectural porch and doorway. The remainder of the present church was built for Protestant worship in 1731. In St. Lachtains time Freshford was a diocese. In 1225 a Bishops palace was built at Aghore (Achadh Ur), now Uppercourt. It was used as a summer residence for over 300 years.
    Abbeys
    Jerpoint Abbey is a Cistercian abbey near Thomastown. It was constructed in 1180, probably on the site of an earlier Benedictine monastery built in 1160 by Domnall Mac Gilla Patraic, King of Osraige.[17] Jerpoint is notable for its stone carvings, including one at the tomb of Felix O'Dulany, Bishop of the Diocese of Ossory when the abbey was founded.
    Duiske Abbey in Graiguenamanagh founded in 1204 was one of the first and largest Cistercianmonasteries in Ireland. What remains of the monastery is a large gothic church which beautifully dominates the town centre in Graiguenamanagh. The abbey derives its name from the river Duiske or Dúbh Uisce which flows through the town on its way to the river Barrow which also flows through this pretty town. Original floor tiles from the original building can be seen in the abbey along with the beautiful gothic and romanesque architecture.
    The Black Abbey in Kilkenny, founded 1225, is a Dominican abbey with two-bay double-height lean-to lower aisle to south. It was extended, c.1325, with four-bay double-height transept to south having four-bay double-height lean-to lower aisle to west.
    Priory
    Kells Priory is one of the largest medieval historic monuments in Ireland. It is a National Monument and is in the guardianship of the Commissioners of Public Works. The priory is scenically situated alongside King's River, about fifteen kilometres south of Kilkenny. One of its most striking feature is a collection of medieval tower houses spaced at intervals along and within walls which enclose a site of just over three acres. These give the priory the appearance more of a fortress than of a place of worship and from them comes its local name of "Seven Castles".
    Friary
    The Callan Augustinian Friary is situated in Callan. It is known locally as the "Abbey Meadow" and is located at the North East of the town on the banks of the Kings Rover. Edmund Butler of Pottlerath, a noted patron of literature, successfully petitioned Pope Pius II for the foundation of the friary in 1461. After Edmund died in 1462, the actual buildings were erected by his son, James, probably after 1467 when he received a papal dispensation to marry his concubine, to whom he was related.
    Visitor Attractions
    -Dunmore Caves is a limestonecave in Ballyfoyle has tourist centre has been established at the site. The cave consistes of a series of chambers formed over millions of years.
    -Jenkinstown Park is about 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) north of the city of Kilkenny and 11 kilometres (6.8 mi) south of Castlecomer off the N78 road. Facilities include a picnic site, forest walks, deer park and a craft centre. A small garden to commemorate Thomas Moore's association with the house has been laid down on the site of the old house. Walks of 1 to 3 kilometres (0.62 to 1.9 mi) are available through a mixed broadleaf and conifer plantation.
    Infrastructure
    Transport
    Iarnród Éireann (Irish Rail) provides rail services from Dublin to Waterford which pass through MacDonagh Station in Kilkenny and Thomastown railway station. Waterford railway station is located just inside County Kilkenny.
    Bus Éireann provide bus services throughout the county.
    Kilkenny Airport is a small airport located just 1.5NM West of Kilkenny City. There are 6 powered resident aircraft and two gliders based at the aerodrome.
    See also
    List of towns and villages in Ireland
    List of abbeys and priories in Ireland (County Kilkenny)
    List of Kilkenny people
    External links
    Ireland portal
    Wikimedia Commons/County Kilkenn
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    Capital: Kilkenny
    Mapa de Kilkenny
    Coordinates: 52°38′52″N 7°15′22″W

    www.castleoliverfarm.com/moresights.html

    Kilkenny (en irlandés: Cill Chainnigh) es la capital del Condado de Kilkenny, República de Irlanda. Situada a orillas del río Nore, la ciudad es conocida por sus edificios medievales y su vida nocturna.
    Se ha conocido a Kilkenny como "La ciudad del mármol" (the "Marble City") durante siglos, debido a la piedra negra que se encuentra en las proximidades de la ciudad, que adorna muchos de sus edificios.
    La ciudad tiene una población de 8.625 habitantes mientras que incluyendo los alrededores, la cifra alcanza los 23.967; es la ciudad más pequeña de Irlanda, tanto por su área como por su población.
    Se le concedió a Kilkenny el estatuto Real en 1609 por el Rey James I; su estatus como ciudad se le concedió más recientemente por la Sección 10(7) de l gobierno local en el año 2001, aunque no tiene los privilegios administrativos de otras ciudades en la República de Irlanda y es administrada por el ayuntamiento municipal.
    Kilkenny is 117km (73miles) from Dublin and 48km (30miles) north of the nearest city Waterford.
    Geography
    Kilkenny is is situated in the Nore Valley on both banks of the River Nore, at the centre of County Kilkenny in the province of Leinster in the south-east of Ireland.
    Culture
    Kilkenny is a popular tourist destination in Ireland. Well regarded for its cultural life, it has always tended to attract culturally aware visitors. Art galleries, historic buildings, craft and design workshops, theatre, comedy, public gardens and museums are some of main reasons Kilkenny has become one of Ireland's most visited towns and a popular base to explore the surrounding countryside.
    Points of interest within the city and its environs include Kilkenny Castle, St. Canice's Cathedral and round tower, Rothe House, St. Mary's Cathedral, Kells Priory, Kilkenny Town Hall, Black Abbey and Jerpoint Abbey.
    The recent rise in "stag" and "hen" parties in the city has seen attempts made at local level to discourage such activity, without impinging on the vibrant nightlife the city is known for.
    Arts and Festivals
    Kilkenny is encouraged as festival location throughout the year and especially during the summer months.
    The Kilkenny Arts Festival established in the 1970s takes place in late August. During this time Kilkenny plays host to contemporary art with Theatre, Dance, Visual Art, Literature, Film, Paintings, Sculptures and live performances. Musical events including traditional, Classical, World, Jazz Music take place durning the festival.
    Kilkenny holds the annual SmithwicksCat Laughs Comedy festival every June.
    The Kilkenny Rhythm and Roots Festival is held on the first weekend in May every year and features the best in Americana/Bluegrass/Folk/Rockabilly/AltCountry in various venues throughout the city.
    Architecture
    La ciudad es famosa por sus muchos edificios medievales y es conocida como la "La ciudad de mármol" desde hace cientos de años, pero la piedra negra con fósiles blancos y decorativos que conforman la estructura de muchos de los edificios de Kilkenny está de hecho pulida, la cual ha sido extraida de los alrededores de la ciudad desde hace cientos de años, en especial de "Black Quarry" (Cantera negra) localizada a una milla del sur de la ciudad.
    Black Quarry - Kilkenny Marble - Black Marble
    En el centro de la ciudad está el castillo de Kilkenny y la Catedral de Saint Canice, el último es admemás un excelente ejemplo de una torre cilíndrica bien conservada. La iglesia dio el nombre a la ciudad (Cill Chainnigh es "Iglesia de Canice" en gaélico).
    Kilkenny Castle - Saint Canice's Cathedral - Round Tower.
    The Church of Ireland Cathedral is named after Saint Canice, who also gave his name to the town (Cill Chainnigh is Irish for "Church of Canice"). Also of note is the Dominican 'Black Abbey', founded in 1225, lying just off Parliament Street.
    Points of interest within the city and its environs include Kilkenny Castle, St. Canice's Cathedral and round tower, Rothe House, St. Mary's Cathedral, Kells Priory, Kilkenny Town Hall, Black Abbey and Jerpoint Abbey.
    St. Canice's Cathedral
    The 13th century cathedral of St Canice is the second longest cathedral in Ireland . The site on which the cathedral stands has been a site of Christian worship since the 6th century. The architectural style of the cathedral is Early Gothic and it is built of limestone. The cathedral has been carefully preserved in its original style and form. It is richly endowed with many stained glass windows including the East window which is a replica of the original 13th century window. The cathedral contains some of the finest 16th century monuments in Ireland. The memorials stretch right across the social spectrum from the great figures of the house of Ormonde to the humble shoemaker and carpenter. The baptismal font is original and the ancient stone of enthronement for bishops still exists under the seat of the medieval throne in the North Transept, where to this day the bishops of Ossory are enthroned. There are continental carvings on the choir stalls and a hammerbeam roof. Beside the cathedral stands the 9th century round tower. It may once have been a watchtower and a refuge and it can be climbed to give an unsurpassed vantage point to view the city of Kilkenny and the surrounding countryside.
    The earliest church on the site is presumed to have been made of wood, being replaced eventually in the later medieval period by a romanesque-style stone church. This was in turn replaced by the current imposing medieval cathedral. List of abbeys and priories in County Kilkenny.
    Infrastructure
    Railway
    Kilkenny railway station opened on 12 May 1848. Kilkenny acquired railway links to Dublin in 1850, Waterford in 1854, Portlaoise in 1876 and Castlecomer in 1919. Córas Iompair Éireann closed the Castlecomer and Kilkenny Junction lines in 1962. Kilkenny railway station was renamed McDonagh Station in 1966 after Irish nationalist, poet and playwright Thomas MacDonagh. Kilkenny remains an important stop on Iarnród Éireann's Intercity route between Dublin and Waterford.
    Unlike other countries, the location of railway stations in Ireland was closely related to military matters rather than trade or public transport{{Fact}. Kilkenny railway station is a fine example of this peculiarity, with the military barracks being closely positioned to the railway station.
    Industry
    The town has a history of brewingand is home to St. Francis Abbey Brewery which was founded in the early 18th century by Messrs Cole and Smithwick. The Guinness Ireland Group had owned this brewery since the 1960s. At the beginning of the 21st century, Guinness merged with Grand Metropolitan plc to form Diageo, the world's largest alcoholic beverage business, and the brewery is now a part of Diageo Global Supply. Smithwick's Ale now forms only a small percentage of production there. Another product is Kilkenny ale , a close relation of Smithwicks ale. Some 80% of beer produced at the brewery is Budweiser, a brand not owned by Diageo, but produced under licence. Diageo announced in May 2008 that it will close the St Francis Abbey Brewery in 2013 and move production to a new brewery on the outskirts of Dublin.
    Kilkenny is also home to the head offices of Glanbia foods, one of the world's top dairy companies. Glanbia was formed by the merger of two dairy businesses: Avonmore and Waterford foods, it employs a total of around 4,000 people and has interests in Ireland, Britain and the USA.
    Recent developments in Kilkenny have attracted further investment from local businesses as well as attracting new industry. Leggetsrath Business Park was opened in 2003. There are two retail warehouse parks in Kilkenny; Kilkenny Retail Park and Ormonde Retail Park. Hebron Business Park was constructed in 2002 and is a privately owned extension to the Hebron Industrial Estate, the main centre for industry in Kilkenny.
    See also
    List of towns and villages in Ireland
    Kilkenny (beer), a brand of beer produced by Guinness
    Kilkenny cat, nickname for a tenacious fighter
    Kilkenny (surname)
    Wikimedia Commons/Kilkenny
    External links
    Kilkenny.ie Portal Site for Kilkenny
    Kilkenny Borough Council
    Kilkenny Arts Festival
    Kilkenny Tourism website
    Wikitravel has a Kilkenny guide.
    "Kilkenny." Encyclopædia Britannica. 2008. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 08 Sep. 2008
    Cat Laughs Comedy Festival
    Kilkenny GAA official site for hurling and football in the county
    Kilkenny and District Soccer League
    Irish Architecture Online - Kilkenny City
    Kilkenny's architectural highlights on the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage website
    Photos of Kilkenny on Flickr
    Kilkenny hurling fansite
    Vultures - A web based sitcom produced in Kilkenny
    www.kilkennyroots.com - Website for Kilkenny Rhythm and Roots Festival. http://www.kilkennyroots.com

    Parliament Street
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    Kilkenny
    Famous for its arts and heritage, Kilkenny is one of Irelands favorite tourist destinations.
    Known as 'The Marble City', Kilkenny contains some of the best preserved medieval structures such as Kilkenny Castle, Rothe House, and Canices Cathedral, architectural treasures which give the city an ambience and character like no other. Host to arguably Europe's best comedy festival and one of Irelands oldest Arts festivals, Kilkenny provides a choice of entertainment to suit all tastes.
    Night Life in Kilkenny is second to none with some of Irelands top pubs and clubs and an 'atmosphere' which makes Kilkenny one of Irelands most popular week end destination.
    In the South there is Licketstown, the world-renowned Famine Village on the River Suir. Thomastown is home to Jerpoint Abbey, while in Callan the birthplace of Edmund Ignatius Rice, founder of the Christian Brothers can be found. Kilkenny's great hurling tradition is celebrated at the Lowry Meagher Heritage Center in Tullarone. Then there is the famous Dunmore Caves outside Kilkenny City.
    Kilkenny is a great sporting County. While hurling is the premier sport, there is also horseracing, golf, fishing, and many other sporting activities. Mount Juliet's Golf Course just outside Thomastown is the most beautiful in the country.
    Attactions not found
    Heritage Sites
    · Dunmore Cave - Ballyfoyle
    History and geology blend at Dunmore Cave to give an interesting and unique situation. Consisting of a series of chambers formed over millions of years, the cave contains some of the finest calcite formations found in any Irish cave. The cave has been known to man for many centuries and is first mentioned in the 9th century Irish Triads. The most interesting reference however, comes from the Annals which tells of a Viking massacre at the cave in the year 928 A.D.. Exhibitions and displays in the Visitor Centre. The cave is inaccessible for wheelchair users
    · Jerpoint Abbey Thomastown - Kilkenny
    An outstanding Cistercian abbey founded in the second half of the 12th century. The church with its Romanesque details dates from this period. In the transept chapels the visitor can see 13th - 16th century tomb sculpture. The tower and cloister date from the 15th century. The chief delight of the Abbey is the sculptured cloister arcade with unique carvings. The Visitor Centre houses an interesting exhibition.
    · Kilkenny Castle - Kilkenny
    A 12th century castle remodelled in Victorian times and set in extensive parklands which was the principal seat of the Butler family, Marquesses and Dukes of Ormonde. Due to major restoration works, the central block now includes a library, drawing room, and bedrooms decorated in 1830s splendour as well as the beautiful Long Gallery. The old Castle kitchen operates as a tea room during the summer. A suite of former servants' rooms is the Butler Art Gallery, which mounts frequently changing exhibitions of contemporary art.
    · St. Mary's Church - Gowran
    This collegiate church, was built in the late 13th century on the site of an earlier monastery. It was served by a "college" - clerics who lived in a community but who did not submit to the rule of a monastery. They lived in a house, now destroyed, beside the church. The church was a large and elaborate structure, with an aisled nave (the main part of the church where the congregation sat) and a long chancel (the section of the church where the altar was placed) and has high quality architectural sculpture used throughout. In the late middle ages a massive tower was inserted between the nave and chancel, and in the 19th century this tower was incorporated into the parish church which was built in place of the chancel and which now takes up about half of the building. There were also several other changes made to the church at various periods
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    Cervezas Kilkenny

    Una auténtica Irish Red Ale producida por la cervecera Smithwicks en la abadía de St. Francis en Kilkenny.
    Brewing in Kilkenny – Diageo Ireland

    Kilkenny es una cerveza tostada del tipo red ale, su color rojo es debido al tostado de la cebada además de la malta. Esta auténtica irish red Ale sabe menos amarga que las ales inglesas, con un sabor malteado y acaramelado.
    Su color y espuma nos recuerdan también a la de su compatriota Guinness, espesa y en cantidad. Por su sabor y ligereza es ideal para los meses de verano en los que una cerveza negra o tostada normales quizás se nos haga muy pesada.
    Igual que con la Guinness se sirve llenando tres cuartos de pinta y se espera a que la espuma se estabilice. Después se rellena apareciendo una capa de espuma cremosa y consistente. Muchos opinan que la Kilkenny es ideal de tomar luego de unas pintas de Guinness.
    La cerveza Kilkenny junto con Guinness pertenecen al grupo Diageo y aparece en los años 80 para poner una versión más fuerte de Smithwick para el mercado europeo y canadiense, debido a la dificultad en la pronunciación del nombre “Smithwick”.
    Está disponible en por lo menos Irlanda, Finlandia, Alemania, Australia, Nueva Zelanda, Canadá, los Países Bajos, Croacia, Rusia, los emiratos árabes unidos, Bahrein, Tailandia, Eslovenia, Suecia, Malasia, Japón, Polonia y Bosnia. Notablemente, Kilkenny no está disponible en los EE.UU., muy probablemente debido a acuerdos comerciales entre Diageo y sus competidores locales.
    Smithwick productora de la Kilkenny, fue fundada por Juan Smithwicks en la abadía del St. Francis de Kilkenny donde los monjes venían produciendo cerveza desde el siglo 14 . Es la cervecería más antigua de Irlanda.
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    Sudeste
    Si va a pasar 4 ó 5 días en esta zona, aquí tiene algunos de los lugares que puede visitar:
    1 El Castillo de Huntington, Carlow
    Además de sus bonitos jardines, tiene un templo dedicado a la Diosa Isis en el sótano y una vid en el invernadero.
    2 El Castillo de Kilkenny
    Es un castillo del siglo XII remodelado en la época victoriana y situado en un parque extenso.
    3 La Abadía de Jerpoint, Kilkenny
    Es una abadía cisterciense magnífica. Está situada a poco más de 1,5 km al sudoeste de Thomastown. Se fundó en la segunda mitad del siglo XII y tiene unas esculturas únicas en el claustro.
    4. La Catedral de San Canices, Kilkenny
    Se completó en 1285 y es la segunda catedral más larga de Irlanda. Se pueden ver las ricas esculturas talladas tanto en piedra como en madera. ¡Algunas de ellas datan del siglo XIII!
    5. Reginalds Tower Museum (Torre-museo Reginalds), Waterford
    La torre ha permanecido en este lugar durante más de mil años, protegiendo los muelles de Waterford. La presente estructura, que data del siglo XII, es el edificio civil urbano más antiguo de la nación.
    6. Waterford Crystal Visitors Centre, Waterford
    Esta cristalería de larga tradición da la bienvenida a turistas de todas partes del mundo. Los visitantes recorren en una visita guiada las áreas de producción actuales, donde se trabaja este cristal conocido en el mundo entero.
    7 Ancestral Home to J.F.Kennedy, Wexford
    Es el lugar de nacimiento del bisabuelo del expresidente John F.Kennedy. El centro de información al visitante ofrece una visita guiada alrededor de la granja originaria en la que se puede ver una muestra audiovisual y objetos familiares excepcionales.
    8 Hook Lighthouse Visitor Centre, Wexford
    Los faros poseen una magia y un misticismo únicos; y aún más Hook Lighthouse, del siglo XIII, siendo el faro más antiguo del norte de Europa que aún funciona.
    9 The National Museum of Agriculture and Rural Life, Wexford
    El Museo Nacional de Agricultura y Vida Rural está situado en los edificios históricos de la granja (1810) de la finca extensa y ornamental del Castillo de Johnstown. En el museo se puede ver una magnífica exposición sobre la hambruna, que cubre la historia de la patata y el gran desastre del 1840.
    10 Altamont Gardens, Carlow
    Se conocen como los jardines más románticos de Irlanda. Altamont es una encantadora mezcla de jardines estructurados y salvajes que se extienden unas 40 hectáreas de tierra.
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    Descubra abadías del siglo XII y catedrales del siglo XIII
    Abadía de Jerpoint
    Una destacable abadía cisterciense fundada en la segunda mitad del siglo XII. Los principales elementos de interés en Jerpoint son el claustro esculpido con tallas únicas.

    Castillo de Kilkenny, Condado de Kilkenny
    El Castillo de Kilkenny ha sido un emplazamiento importante desde que Strongbow construyó aquí el primer castillo, que era probablemente una estructura de madera, en el siglo XII. Sigue manteniendo un excelente estado de conservación, y muchos de sus elementos originales.
    Catedral de San Canice, Irishtown, Ciudad de Kilkenny
    Esta catedral, del siglo XIII, es la segunda más grande de Irlanda. El lugar en el que actualmente se levanta la catedral ha sido un lugar de culto cristiano desde el siglo VI.
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    ¿Lo sabía?
    El autor de los viajes de Gulliver, Jonathan Swift estudió en el Colegio Kilkenny Grammar School.
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    Los lugares más bonitos de Irlanda - Listas - 20minutos.es
    Vuela Viajes
    Condado de Kilkenny
    Alojamiento_Kilkenny Antiguamente ocupado [...]

    Centro del condado de Kilkenny
    Alojamiento_Kilkenny El centro del condado [...]

    El Norte del Condado Kilkenny
    Alojamiento_Kilkenny Esta parte más [...]

    Alojamiento_Kilkenny
    - Bus Eireann (llamar al 776 4933 para más informaciones o por internet al www.buseireann.ie)
    - propone transportes ída y vuelta entre Dublín y Cork.- El tren entre Dublín y Waterford, para en Kilkenny . Contacte la estación Mc Donagh al 444 1264 para más informaciones).
    Kilkenny tourist attractions
    Butlers Gallery - The Tholsel

    St. Francis Abbey
    St Canices Cathedral - Black Abbey - Map of Kilkenny - Getting to Kilkenny - Kilkenny Castle - Kilkenny tourist attractions - Best Kilkenny Hotel Deals
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    Kilkenny
    Haga un viaje al condado de Irlanda con la mejor artesanía tradicional, ¡y aproveche también para reírse de lo lindo!
    Recorridos por la zonaDescubra abadías del siglo XII y catedrales del siglo XIII
    Abadía de Jerpoint
    Una destacable abadía cisterciense fundada en la segunda mitad del siglo XII. Los principales elementos de interés en Jerpoint son el claustro esculpido con tallas únicas.
    Castillo de Kilkenny, Condado de Kilkenny
    El Castillo de Kilkenny ha sido un emplazamiento importante desde que Strongbow construyó aquí el primer castillo, que era probablemente una estructura de madera, en el siglo XII. Sigue manteniendo un excelente estado de conservación, y muchos de sus elementos originales.
    Catedral de San Canice, Irishtown, Ciudad de Kilkenny
    Esta catedral, del siglo XIII, es la segunda más grande de Irlanda. El lugar en el que actualmente se levanta la catedral ha sido un lugar de culto cristiano desde el siglo VI.
    Ver más
    Iglesia de St Mary, Condado de Kilkenny
    Esta Iglesia colegiata fue construida a finales del siglo XIII donde previamente hubo un antiguo monasterio. Habiendo sido grande e impresionante en su día, hay todavía ejemplos de la gran calidad arquitectónica utilizada en su construcción.
    Actividades
    Desde la escalofriante velocidad de los karts a una regata de verano llena de diversión
    Pesca
    Perfeccione el arte de la pesca con mosca en el precioso Río Nore.
    Go Karting, Ballyhale
    Este circuito de 1.000 metros ofrece excelente karting en un entorno seguro.
    Festival de Regatas y Remo de Graiguenamanagh, Graiguenamanagh
    Se trata del divertido festival de regatas más antiguo en las vías fluviales del interior de Irlanda. Mucha natación, buceo y remo, además de un montón de eventos musicales.
    Ver más
    Hípica y carreras
    Diríjase al Hipódromo de Gowran Park y admire estas carreras en una de las mejores pistas del país. Pero si prefiere ir en la silla, vaya a Riding in Ireland Week en Piltown, Condado de Kilkenny, durante el mes de Septiembre.
    Niños
    Prepárese para una aventura al aire libre, en un río embravecido o una simpática granja
    Aventuras en el Río Go With the Flow, Graiguenamanagh
    Aventuras en piragüa para toda la familia, desde descensos por los rápidos del río, a tranquilos paseos.
    Granja Nore Valley Park, Bennetsbridge
    A los niños les encantará acercarse a los animales en esta granja de bonito diseño. Hay arenero para los más pequeños, y saltos sobre pilas de paja, una zona de picnic y posibilidad de un paseo de 3 km por el río.
    Cultura y Festivales
    Disfrute de la rica vida cultural en Kilkenny, con una dinámica galería, fabulosos festivales y abundancia de artes
    Galería Butler
    Una de las más dinámicas galerías contemporáneas de Irlanda que atrae a importantes artistas internacionales, sin descuidar por ello a los locales.
    Kilkenny Craft Trail
    Apréndalo todo sobre la dinámica industria artesana de Kilkenny con una visita a la gran cantidad de tiendas y estudios existentes.
    Festival Rhythm y Roots de Kilkenny
    Un evento fundamental en el calendario musical de Irlanda, este excelente festival incluye Americana, country, blues, música alternativa, folk, rockabilly y western swing.
    Ver más
    Festival de la Comedia Smithwicks Cat Laughs
    Un montón de actuaciones humorísticas nacionales e internacionales en este festival realmente divertido.
    Hoteles, Bares y Restaurantes
    Desde opulentas casas de campo a pubs llenos de ambiente
    Casa Butler, Ciudad de Kilkenny
    Residencia de los Condes de Ormonde, Butler House luce impresionantes balaustradas, escayolas, chimeneas de mármol y un precioso jardín. Las habitaciones son una mezcla única de antiguo y moderno, y son espaciosas y confortable.
    Hudsons, Station Road, Thomastown
    Deliciosa comida contemporánea en un entorno perfectamente decorado con vistas a un pequeño jardín.
    Pubs, Ciudad de Kilkenny
    Kilkenny está llena de pubs pequeños con un ambiente excepcional. Es sin duda la mejor ciudad donde tomar unas pintas en todo el sureste. Pruebe la cerveza local Kilkenny en el Marble City Bar, Jim Hollands, Matthew Duggan’s, John Cleere’s y Caislean ui Cuain.
    Compras
    Kilkenny es un floreciente centro de artesanía
    Chesneau Leather, The Old Creamery, Bennettsbridge, Condado de Kilkenny
    Una excelente gama de cinturones, bolsos y artículos de cuero modernos y con mucho estilo.
    Kilkenny Design Centre, Castle Yard, Kilkenny
    Kilkenny ofrece una buena selección de artesanía, cerámica, joyería y ropa.
    National Craft Gallery, Castle Yard, Kilkenny
    Una muestra del excelente diseño irlandés.

  2. #1662
    Usuario Avatar de Nettus
    Fecha de ingreso
    01 feb, 08
    Ubicación
    Lundby
    Mensajes
    4,725

    Predeterminado Waterford

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    15. Condado:Waterford- Capital: Waterford
    Accommodation in Waterford-Map of Waterford Ireland
    Large Map of Ireland - Road Map of Ireland
    Provincia: Munster - Area:1,837 km2 - Population: ~ 110.000 - www.waterfordcoco.ie

    Annestown - Ardmore - Ballyduff - Ballymacarbry - Ballynamult - Bunmahon
    Butlerstown - Cappoquin - Cheekpoint - Clashmore - Dungarvan - Dunhill
    Dunmore east - Ferrybank - Grange - Killotteran - Kilmacthomas - Kilmeaden
    Lismore - Little island - Monard - Passage east - Portlaw - Ring - Slieverue
    Stradbally - Tallow - Tramore - Waterford - Woodstown
    El Condado de Waterford(en irlandés: Contae Phort Láirge) está situado en la provincia de Munster, en la costa sur de Irlanda. Tanto en población como en extensión, es el condado más pequeño de Munster.
    Geografía
    En Waterford existen dos cadenas montañosas: las Montañas Knockmealdown y las Montañas Comeragh. El punto más alto del condado es Knockmealdown (794 m). También se pueden encontrar numerosos ríos, entre los que se incluyen el tercer río más largo de Irlanda, el río Suir (184 km), y el cuarto más largo, el Munster Blackwater (168 km). Hay sobre unas 30 playas a lo largo de la línea costera volcánica del condado. Waterford cuenta con un Gaeltacht (zona en la que se habla mayoritariamente irlandés).
    An Déise
    El condado de Waterford es conocido como An Déise. Los Déise fueron una tribu gaélica que se estableció en la zona entre los siglos IV y VIII d.C. Se pueden encontrar numerosos restos de los Déise hoy en día: tumbas megalíticas, piedras ogham, el dolmen Gaulstown, la Torre Reginalds y la Torre Ballysaggartmore.

    People
    The people that live in the Déise today are known to thrive on Irish traditions such as hurling and eating blaas (a type of flourybread roll, unique to the region).
    Baronies
    The westernmost of the baronies of county Waterford are "Decies within Drum" and "Decies without Drum", separated by the Drum-Fineen hills.
    Location Grid
    North: County Tipperary -Northeast: County Kilkenny -West: County Cork -County Waterford East: County Wexford -South: Celtic Sea
    See also
    List of abbeys and priories in the Republic of Ireland (County Waterford)
    Saint Declan
    External links
    County Council website
    Work in Waterford- Provide assistance for people who wish to work in county Waterford.
    Invest in Waterford- an initiative by Waterford County Council to encourage industry to invest in County Waterford.
    Map of Waterford
    Waterford County Museum - 3500 pages of County Waterford history
    Waterford County Image Archive - Thousands of photos and images from County Waterford history
    WaterfordTourism.org - Official Waterford Tourism website
    The Diocese of Waterford and Lismore
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    Capital: Waterford City
    Waterford City Map
    WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 52°15′30″ N 7°07′08″ W / 52.2583, -7.119
    Population: ~ 50.000 - www.waterfordcity.ie
    Waterford (en irlandés: Port Láirge) es históricamente la capital de Condado de Waterford en Irlanda, aunque en la actualidad la ciudad tiene una administración separada de la del condado, teniendo éste su sede en Dungarvan.
    Waterford fue la primera ciudad de Irlanda, fundada por los vikingos en el año 914. En la actualidad, Waterford es la quinta mayor ciudad de la República de Irlanda.
    Its motto Urbs Intacta Manet Waterfordia ("Waterford remains the untaken city"), that did not capitulate to Cromwell's New Model Army, but surrendered to Henry Ireton on 6 August 1650.
    Waterford is the largest city in Ireland to retain its Viking-derived name, Vedrarfjord. Reginald's Tower is the oldest urban civic building in Ireland, and the oldest monument to retain its Viking name. It is to this day Waterford's most recognisable landmark. The tower is believed to be the first building in Ireland to use mortar.
    The population of the city in 2006 was 49,240; of which 45,775 lived within the city limits, and 3,465 lived in the city's suburbs in County Kilkenny.
    The River Suir flows through Waterford city and has provided a basis for Waterford's long maritime history. Waterford Port has been one of Ireland's major ports for over a millennium. In the 19th century shipbuilding was a major industry in the city. The owners of the Neptune Shipyard, the Malcomson family, built and operated the largest fleet of iron steamers in the world between the mid-1850s and the late-1860s, including five trans-atlantic passenger liners.
    Today, Waterford is synonymous with Waterford Crystal the world over, a legacy of one of the city's most successful and enduring industries, glass making. Glass, or crystal, has been manufactured in the city since 1783. Waterford is the sister city of St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador and Rochester, New York.
    History
    Places of interest
    The old city of Waterford consists of various cultural quarters. The oldest is what has been referred to as the Viking triangle. This is the part of the city surrounded by the original 10th century fortifications, which is triangular in shape with its apex at Reginald's tower. Though this was once the site of a thriving Viking city, the city centre has shifted to the west over the years, and it is now a quiet and tranquil area, dominated by narrow streets, medieval architecture, and civic spaces. Over the past decade, a number of restaurants have opened in High Street and Henrietta Street, taking advantage of the charming character of the area. Much of Waterford's impressive architecture is to be found in the Viking triangle.
    In the 15th century, the city was enlarged with the building of an outer wall on the west side. Today Waterford retains more of its city walls than any other city in Ireland with the exception of Derry, whose walls were built much later. Tours of Waterford's city walls are conducted daily.
    The Quay, once termed by historian Mark Girouard 'the noblest quay in Europe', is a mile long from Grattan Quay to Adelphi Quay, though Adelphi Quay is now a residential area. It is still a major focal point for Waterford, commercially and socially, and the face that Waterford presents to those traveling into the city from the north. Near Reginald's Tower is the William Vincent Wallace Plaza, a monument and amenity built around the time of the millennium that commemorates the Waterford born composer.
    John Roberts Square is a pedestrianised area that is one of the main focal points of Waterford's modern day commercial centre.
    It was named after the city's most celebrated architect, John Roberts, and was formed from the junction of Barronstrand Street, Broad Street and George's Street. It is often referred to locally as Red Square, due to the red paving that was used when the area was first pedestrianised. A short distance to the east of John Roberts Square is Arundel Square, another square with a fine commercial tradition, which the City Square shopping centre opens onto.
    Ballybricken, in the west, just outside the city walls, is thought to have been Waterford's Irishtown, a type of settlement that often formed outside Irish cities to house the Vikings and Irish that had been expelled during the Norman conquest of Ireland. Ballybricken is an inner city neighbourhood with a long tradition, centred around Ballybricken hill, which was a large, open market-square. Today it has been converted into a green, civic space, but the Bull Post, where livestock was once bought and sold, still stands as a remnant of the hill's past.
    The Mall is a fine Georgian thoroughfare, built by the Wide Streets Commission in order to extend the city southwards. It contains some of the city's finest Georgian architecture. The People's Park, Waterford's largest and finest park, is located nearby.
    Ferrybank is Waterford city's only suburb north of the river. It contains a village centre of its own.
    In April 2003 an important site combining a 5th century Iron Age and 9th century Viking settlement was discovered at Woodstown near the city, which appears to have been a Viking town that predates all such settlements in Ireland.

    Scotch Quay, Waterford
    Crime
    Official statistics show that Waterford's serious crime figures are on a par with other urban areas in Ireland i.e. Cork, Limerick & Galway but are significantly lower than the Dublin Metropolitan area.
    Culture
    Museums - Art galleries - Theatre - Events - Cinema - Libraries
    Transport and infrastructure
    Waterford currently provides access to five primary means of transport; Road, Rail, Bus, Air and Sea.
    Roads
    Waterford is connected to other major centres via the N9 to Dublin, the N25 to Cork (west) and Rosslare (east) and the N24 to Limerick.
    In and around the city itself, the N25 is soon to be re-routed to include the Waterford City Bypass, currently under construction, which will feature a second river crossing for the city. This project will include the Western Link road that will connect the bypass to the Outer Ring Road. The Outer Ring Road (R710), is a major road that encircles the south of the city. When the bypass and Western Link are finished by 2010, it will be possible to travel in a circle almost the entire way around the city, from the Dunmore Road to Slieverue in County Kilkenny.
    Rail
    The main railway station servicing Waterford city is Plunkett (named in honour of nationalist leader Joseph Plunkett). It is located across Edmund Rice bridge on the north side of the Suir. Waterford railway station opened on 26 August 1864.
    There are seven daily connections to Dublin; four daily connections to Limerick Junction; and one direct daily connection each way to Rosslare Europort and onwards to Wexford & Enniscorthy. There are no direct passenger services between Waterford and Cork since the Waterford to Mallow line closed to passengers in 1967. A change at Limerick Junction allows passengers to join the Dublin-Cork line. There is a direct line between Waterford and Limerick, but passengers must change at Limerick Junction on all services. There is also a direct line to Rosslare Europort. The Waterford to Ballinacourty railway, part of the Mallow branch, was preserved to allow for freight to be transported from Quigley Magnesite. The line shut in 1982 with the shock closure of Quigley Magnesite and the line was finally lifted in 1993.
    The line to New Ross closed to passengers in 1964 and to freight rail in 1976. The Waterford to Tramore Railway closed in 1961.
    The Waterford & Suir Valley Railway follows 6 km of the old Waterford to Dungarvan/Cork route on a narrow gauge line. It is a heritage route that runs between Waterford and Kilmeaden. The panoramic views from this line are considered to be exceptional.
    Bus
    Bus services are provided by Bus Éireann to all major Irish centres, and by J.J. Kavanagh & Sons to locations such as Dublin and Carlow. The Bus Éireann station is located on the quays opposite Dooleys Hotel and J.J. Kavanagh & Sons stop at both the Bus Éireann station and on Parnell Street. Bus Éireann have ten daily services to Dublin Monday to Saturday with five on a Sunday. J.J. Kavanagh & Sons have ten daily departures to Dublin Monday to Saturday and nine on a Sunday.
    City bus services are provided by Bus Éireann and by J.J. Kavanagh & Sons.
    Air
    Waterford Airport serves Waterford and the south east region. Aer Arann is currently the only carrier operating out of the airport. It is currently possible to fly between Waterford and Birmingham, London Luton and Manchester in the UK. From 1 May 2008, Summer flights will resume to Lorient (France), Bordeaux (France), Faro (Portugal), Malaga (Spain) and Amsterdam. All users of the airport are subject to a €5 tax which must be paid in cash.
    There is an air sea rescue service operating out of Waterford Airport from a dedicated Irish Coastguard base. This operation is currently contracted to a private operator, CHC Ireland. Rescue cover is provided by a Sikorsky S-61. A reserve S-61 helicopter is also based here. Waterford airport is also the base of the Pilot Training College, which trains pilots up to and including commercial pilot rating.
    Sea
    The Port of Waterford is a major Irish port, and the closest one to mainland Europe. The port is on the River Suir, at Belview, County Kilkenny, 16 km (10 miles) from the open sea. It handles lo-lo, bulk liquid, bulk solid and breakbulk/general cargoes. It is the fastest growing port in Ireland. In 2005, 776 vessels called at the port carrying a total of 2.6 million tonnes of cargo. Container throughput in 2005 was 137,453 laden 6m (20ft) equivalent units. Waterford is also a port of call for many cruise liners. The famous Queen Elizabeth2 has visited while many small liners can make it up river to the inner port in the heart of the city. The port hosted the Tall Ships race in 2005 and will do so again in 2011.
    The closest passenger port is Rosslare Europort (72 km (45 miles) away by road), which has services to Fishguard, Pembroke Dock, Cherbourg, Roscoff and Le Havre.
    Ver también
    Blaa - Deise - John's River - List of towns and villages in Ireland
    Little Island - The People's Park - The Three Sisters: The River Barrow,
    River Nore and River Suir - Waterford Crystal - world famous glassware factory
    Waterford, CT - Waterford Museum of Treasures -
    Woodstown - Early Viking of the River Suir.
    South-East GDP 2002 - Official site - Waterford County Council
    Official site - Waterford City Council - Waterford Chamber of Commerce
    Port of Waterford - Waterford Colloquialisms at Wiktionary - Waterford Local Radio
    Waterford News & Star newspaper - Munster Express newspaper - Waterford Today
    Waterford Treasures Official Site - Dyehouse Gallery Official Homepage
    The Theatre Royal Official Homepage - The Garter Lane Arts Centre Official Homepage
    Red Kettle Official Homepage - Spraoi Official Homepage
    Waterford Youth Arts Official Homepage - Spraoi Official Homepage
    Waterford International Festival Of Light Opera Official Homepage
    WFFA - Waterford Film For All - Waterford Cineplex page at Go Ireland
    Storm Cinemas - Waterford - Beat 102-103 Official Homepage
    Waterford Reports Page on City.ie
    The Waterford & Suir Valley Railway Official Homepage
    Coach Hire, Bus Hire, Mini Bus Hire, Travel Tours around Ireland with J.J. Kavanagh and Sons, Minibus Hire, Dublin Airport Coach and bus timetables
    Waterford Airport Official Homepage - http://www.rosslare-europort.ie/

    www.tvlspecialists.com/irelandgallery.htm
    Today Waterford (shown below) is the cultural, economic, educational, technological and industrial capital of the South East region and its port the traditional source of wealth continues to expand in line with the growth of the Irish economy. It has an amazing coastline with over 30 beaches and three mountain ranges.
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    WATERFORD is a modern European port wrapped around an ancient Irish city. It's an important commercial centre and this, coupled with a large student population, makes it a fairly lively place. Alongside the city's modernity, though, there's plenty that's traditional, most obviously the place of the pub as a focal point of social activity, and the persistence of traditional music.
    The layout of the city, with its long quays and adjacent narrow lanes, dates back to its origin as a Viking settlement in the mid-ninth century.
    Waterford flourished as a European port into the eighteenth century - the period when the famous Waterford crystal was first produced - and there's plenty of architectural evidence of this prosperity.
    Reginald's Tower is Waterford's most historic building. A large, cylindrical, late-twelfth-century tower in the quays area of the city, it houses the city's museum, which has an impressive collection of royal charters showing the central role of Waterford's allegiance to the English Crown from the arrival of Henry II in 1171 onwards.
    Wander up Bailey's New St just behind the tower and you'll immediately come to Waterford's other important medieval building, the ruined French Church, or Greyfriars.
    Founded by Franciscans in 1240, it was used as a place of worship by French Huguenot refugees from 1693 to 1815. Nearby is the City Heritage Centre, a showcase for recently excavated Viking and Norman artifacts of outstanding quality and design.
    Further up Bailey's New St, you enter Waterford's next significant period of church-building at Christ Church Cathedral, which currently hosts a sound and light presentation of the city's history. Built in the 1770s by John Roberts, who did much work in Waterford for both Catholics and Protestants, it's a nicely proportioned building, with some fine monuments inside - look out for the tomb of James Rice (1482), an effigy of a corpse in an advanced state of decay.
    By far the finest eighteenth-century architectural detail in the city, though, is the beautiful oval staircase inside the Chamber of Commerce in George St, yet again by John Roberts. Georgian housing continues down O'Connell St, where the Garter Lane Arts Centre has a gallery, a theatre and a good events noticeboard.
    County Waterford is world famous as the home of Waterford Crystal.
    And there is so much more that makes Waterford a wonderful place to spend your holidays. The pace of life is relaxed, and the variety of activities delicious. From golf to angling and walking, all tastes are catered for.
    Nestling on the South East coast of Ireland, Waterford is within one or two hours of Shannon, Dublin, and Cork airports, and Rosslare and Ringaskiddy Ferries.

    Waterford Castle, Co. Waterford - jbriankelly.com/index_ireland.htm < CLIC < (mucha foto)

    Main Tourist Attractions
    · Curraghmore House - Portlaw
    Located at Portlaw, Curraghmore House is owned by the Marquis of Waterford and has been home to his ancestors since 1170. The interior has exceptionally fine plasterwork. The House is open by prior appointment year round, Monday to Friday. The guided tours are usually conducted personally by Lord Waterford. The superbly landscaped gardens beside Curraghmore House, incorporate a shell house, the interior of which was designed by Catherine,
    · Lismore Heritage Centre - Lismore
    This former courthouse has now become the Lismore Heritage Centre, with Lismore's Celtic origins on view in the historical display room. The story of Lismore dates from 636 and is told in an award-winning presentation narrated by Niall Toibin.
    · Passage East - Waterford
    A small, friendly fishing village based around two open squares. The fishing village is built beneath a high escarpment with small squares, streets and three main quays: Boathouse Quay, Haketts Quay and Middle Quay. From here you can hop on the ferry that crosses the River Suir to the Wexford side of Ballyhack. The village hosts a Mussel Festival every September.
    · Waterford Treasures at the Granary - Waterford
    Located at Merchants Quay, Waterford City. Sail the seas on a Viking ship, attend the wedding of Strongbow and Aoife, and see the finest works of Waterford Glass. Waterford Treasures at the Granary is both a treasury and a treasure trail that takes you through one thousand years of Ireland's oldest city.
    Heritage Sites
    · Reginalds Tower - Waterford
    Located at The Quay, Waterford City, Reginalds Tower dates from the late twelfth century and is the oldest urban civic building in the country. It has recently been completely restored to its medieval appearance. The heritage museum houses two fascinating collections. On the ground floor, artefacts from the Viking and Medieval periods are on display. The mezzanine floor houses one of Ireland's great collections of decorated charters and civic regalia.
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    ¿Lo sabía?
    Waterford es una ciudad muy antigua, fundada por los vikingos en el año 853.
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    www.shopmft.com/Designer-Gallery.cfm?idsDesig...
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    Crystal, China, Gifts, and Lamps by Waterford : Region Selector -
    Waterford Crystal Visitor Centre
    House of Ireland - Waterford Crystal - Irish Gifts - John Rocha ...
    Waterford Crystal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Quizás Waterford es conocido en el mundo entero por su fabuloso cristal, pero hay mucho más que cristal tallado en este condado. Con una mezcla perfecta de montañas, playas y emoción urbana, Waterfod es incomparable a ningún otro condado de Irlanda.
    Dada su privilegiada posición en la soleada costa sureste del país, las playas son una verdadera atracción en Waterford, con aguas transparentes y espectaculares paisajes.
    Muchos de los pueblos más bonitos de Waterford se encaraman en las orillas de preciosas bahías, mientras que las ciudades de Lismore, Cappoquin y Ballymacarbry se encuentra en el tranquilo Valle del Nire.
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    Waterford
    Prepárate para un viaje a la ciudad más antigua de Irlanda.
    La Ciudad de Waterford, Condado de Waterford en el Sur está llena de historia y patrimonio. Esta ciudad preciosa estaba fundada por los Vikingos en 853 d C.
    Waterford es la ciudad más antigua de irlanda pero áhora tiene una gran cantidad de modernos centros comerciales, pubs y bares llena de vida y restaurantes de alta calidad. ¡Disfruta de esa ciudad que es moderna y antigua a la vez!
    Tambien Waterford tiene su exquisito cristal que está famoso en todo el mundo. Es imposible de volver a casa sin comprar algo especial del cristal de waterford.
    La ciudad tiene una larga tradición en música y teatro. No puedes perder la gran cantidad de festivales y eventos como el Festival de Ópera de Waterford, el Festival Spraoi y el Festival Internacional de Niños "Hullabaloo". Seguro que encontráras muchas cosas para ver y hacer en esa ciudad tan divertida.

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  3. #1663
    Usuario Avatar de Nettus
    Fecha de ingreso
    01 feb, 08
    Ubicación
    Lundby
    Mensajes
    4,725

    Predeterminado Cork

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    16. Condado:Cork - Capital: Cork
    Province: Munster - Area:7,457 km2 - Population: ~ 485.000 - www.corkcoco.ie

    www.irelandmapxl.com/cork-map.html
    www.tierneys-kinsale.com/map.htm
    Click Here for map of Kinsale town and directions to Tierney's Guesthouse >>

    El Condado de Cork (en inglés County Cork, en irlandés Contae Chorcaí) es el más suroccidental y el mayor de los modernos condados de la República de Irlanda. Se lo menciona a menudo como "El condado rebelde", debido a que ha solido tomar un partido diferente al de la mayoría de Irlanda durante los conflictos. La capital del condado es Cork y sus principales atracciones son la piedra de Blarney y el pueblo de Cobh.

    County Cork (Irish: Contae Chorcaí) is the most southerly and the largest of the modern counties of Ireland. Cork is nicknamed "The Rebel County", as a result of the support of the townsmen of Cork in 1491 for Perkin Warbeck, a pretender to the throne of England during the Wars of the Roses. In more recent times, the name has referred to the prominent role Cork played in the Irish War of Independence (1919-1921) and its position as an anti-treaty stronghold during the Irish Civil War (1922-23). Attractions include the Blarney Stone and Cobh (formerly Queenstown), the port where many Irish emigrants boarded for their voyage to the United States, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, or South Africa and also the last stop of the Titanic, before departing on its doomed journey. The city of Cork is the second largest city in the Republic of Ireland and capital of the province of Munster.
    The remote western area of the county, known as West Cork, is a popular destination for tourists, who visit the small villages and islands including Sherkin Island, Oileán Chléire or Cape Clear Island and Dursey Island. Mizen Head, the "southwesternmost point in Ireland" is also in West Cork, as is Sheep's Head.
    In recent years land in the far west of the county has become in high demand internationally, and large numbers of EU citizens have settled in the area, along with celebrities such as Jeremy Irons. West Cork is noted for its rugged natural beauty, fine beaches and distinct social atmosphere.
    History -Historia - Lengua irlandesa - Economía
    Language
    County Cork has two Gaeltacht areas where the Irish language is the primary medium of everyday speech. These are Múscraí (English: Muskerry) in the north of the county, especially the village of Cúil Aodha (English: Coolea) and Oileán Chléire (English: Cape Clear Island) an island in the west.
    Economy
    The harbour area to the immediate east of the city is home to a large number of pharmaceutical and medical companies.
    Geography
    The highest point in County Cork is Knockboy, at 703m. It is on the border with County Kerry and may be accessed from the area known as Priests Leap, near the village of Coomhola.
    Wildlife
    A collection of the marine algae is housed in the Herbarium of the botany department of the University College Cork.
    Septs and Families of Cork
    Cork was astronghold for many powerfulsepts and families of Munster, most of them of Eoghanacht lineage. Common Cork surnames are Ahern, Buckley, Collins, Cronin, Crowley, Daly/Daley, Flynn, Foley, Gould, Healy, Horgan, Kennedy, Lee, Long, McCarthy, Murphy, Noonan, O'Callaghan, O'Cronin, O'Connor, Hurley, O'Donovan, O'Driscoll, O'Keeffe, O'Leary, O'Mahony, O'Riordan, O'Rourke, O'Sullivan, Sheehan and Twomey. Cotter is a Hiberno-Norse surname originating in the city of Cork. Some prevalent Norman-Irish names are Barrett, Barry, Fitzgerald, Walsh, White,and Griffin
    Location Grid
    North: County Limerick - Northeast: County Tipperary - West: County Kerry - County Cork - East: County Waterford - Southwest: Atlantic Ocean - South: Celtic Sea
    See also
    List of abbeys and priories in the Republic of Ireland (County Cork)
    List of towns and villages in County Cork
    External links
    Cork County Council
    Guide to County Cork for Tourism & Business
    County Cork Travel guide
    People's Republic of Cork
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    Capital: Cork
    Cork city map, Detailed Map of Cork, Cork Street Map - ViaMichelin -
    Coordenadas: 51° 53′ 50″ N, 8° 28′ 12″ W

    El río Lee a su paso por Cork

    Cork (Corcaigh o "Marisma", en irlandés) es la segunda ciudad más importante de la República de Irlanda sólo superada en tamaño por Dublín.
    Es la capital del condado de Cork, se encuentra en la provincia de Munster y posee un importante puerto marítimo. El río Lee atraviesa la ciudad y justo antes de entrar al casco urbano se divide en dos caudales que separan la ciudad en tres partes, donde la central corresponde al centro histórico.
    The city has a population of 119,143, while the addition of the suburban areas contained in Cork County brings this total to 190,384.
    Metropolitan Cork has a population of approximately 274,000, while the Greater Cork area is about 380,000.
    The city's name is derived from the Irish word corcach, meaning "marshy place", referring to its situation on the River Lee. Cork has a reputation for rebelliousness dating back to the town's support of the English pretender Perkin Warbeck in 1491 following the Wars of the Roses. Cork County has the nickname of "the Rebel County", and Corkonians often refer to Cork as the "real capital of Ireland".
    The River Lee flows through the city, an island in the river forming the main part of the city centre just before the Lee flows into Lough Mahon and then to Cork Harbour, the world's second largest natural harbour, after Sydney, Australia. The city is a major Irish seaport — with quays and docks sited along the broad waterway of the Lee on the city's East side. Cork is one of three constituent cities in the Cork-Limerick-Galway corridor with a population of 1 million people.
    Cómo llegar a Cork
    El Aeropuerto Internacional de Cork ha sido hace poco notablemente mejorado con la construcción de una nueva terminal moderna que aumentará la capacidad del aeropuerto a 3 millones de personas. Aer Lingus y Ryanair vuelan desde varias poblaciones españolas hasta Cork durante todo el año, con mayor frecuencia de vuelos durante el verano. Desde el aeropuerto se puede coger un taxi o un autobús para llegar a la ciudad.
    Lugares de interés
    La ciudad de Cork presume en general de buena arquitectura, capaz de rivalizar con Dublín y Belfast. La calle principal, St Patrick Street, fue remodelada a partir de 2004. Al ser la principal calle comercial, ostenta destacados edificios a lo largo de su ancha avenida (gran parte de la cual es peatonal). La adyacente Grand Parade es una avenida con líneas de árboles, en la que están la mayoría de las oficinas e instituciones financieras. El antiguo centro financiero es el South Mall, con varios bancos cuyo interior es del siglo XIX y que merece la pena visitar, en especial el Allied Irish Bank que antiguamente fue de cambio. Muchos de los edificios de la ciudad son de estilo Georgiano, aunque la moderna torre del County Hall es el edificio más alto de Irlanda. Cruzando el río está el edificio más grande de Irlanda, el Hospital Mental, construido en la época victoriana, que ha sido renovado y convertido en un complejo residencial.
    El edificio más famoso de Cork es la torre de la Iglesia de Shandon, que domina el lado norte de la ciudad. Las caras norte y este están hechas de arenisca roja, y las este y sur con piedra caliza blanca, predominante en la región. El reloj de la torre es conocido como el Mentiroso de las Cuatro Caras (The Tour-faced Liar), ya que desde la base del edificio cada reloj parece mostrar una hora diferente. Shandon está abierta al público, que puede tocar las campanas.
    El Ayuntamiento, otro espléndido edificio de piedra caliza, sustituye el antiguo, destruido por fuerzas británicas el 11 de diciembre de 1920 durante la Guerra de Independencia en un suceso conocido como “la Quema de Cork”. El coste de este nuevo edificio fue asumido por el Gobierno Británico en 1930 como gesto de reconciliación. Hay dos catedrales en la ciudad: la Catedral Católico-Romana, St Mary's Cathedral (conocida comúnmente como la Catedral del Norte) y la Catedral de la Iglesia de Irlanda, St Finbarre' Cathedral. La moderna Casa de la Ópera de Cork es una de los poco locales de este tipo que existen en Irlanda.
    El Parque Fitzgerald, al oeste de la ciudad, merece una visita – como los jardines de la Universidad, a través de los cuales pasa el río Lee.
    El Mercado Inglés, accesible desde Grand Parade, Patrick Street, Oliver Plunkett Street y Princes Street, es un mercado cubierto de pescado, fruta, carne, especias y exquisiteces. Los orígenes del mercado pueden establecerse en 1610, pero el edificio actual data de 1786.
    La European walking route E8, que cruza el continente, empieza en Cork y finaliza 4700 km más adelante en Estambul, Turquía.
    Las cercanías también ofrecen muchas posibilidades por los turistas. Blarney Castle es una de las más notables y famosas atracciones ya que es famoso por su roca. Según la leyenda, si besas la roca, esta te dará elocuencia.
    Para más información, hay varias oficinas de turismo a disposición del visitante.
    Ocio
    No hay carencia de actividades nocturnas en Cork. Hay una gran cantidad de restaurantes excelentes como el Fenns Quay y el Isaacs. La ciudad es famosa por sus locales con música en directo como el Cyprus Avenue, Sober Lane, An Cruisin Lan y Charlies.
    Las discotecas más destacadas son The Savoy, Fast Eddies, Rafterz, Cubins, Havana Browns, The Qube, Redz, Instinct y Club Classic. De los bares nocturnos destacan The Old Oak y An Bróg en la calle Oliver Plunkett, y The Quad en la calle Tuckey.
    Para el día, nada mejor para disfrutar de una auténtica atmósfera irlandesa que visitar los numerosos pubs que hay en la ciudad.
    Criminalidad
    En un oscuro periodo a principios de 2003, cuando diez personas murieron en circunstancias violentas o sospechosas en la ciudad y su entorno, se temía que el comercio de drogas y los ataques de bandas violentas estuvieran fuera de control, con asaltos callejeros que no fueron provocados y que causaron indignación popular, y con asesinatos causados por las drogas, sobre todo el Dublín Hill y la calle Barrack.
    En cualquier caso, las estadísticas oficiales de An Garda Síochána de los años 2001-2005 reflejan que la criminalidad en Cork está a la par de otras áreas urbanas irlandesas y es significativamente menor que en el área metropolitana de Dublín.
    Comercio
    El comercio en Cork se está desarrollando rápidamente con los centros comerciales que mezclan modernidad y arte y las tiendas locales familiares que venden productos exclusivos y a menudo hechos a mano.
    Los grandes almacenes son para todos los bolsillos, desde caras boutiques a pequeñas tiendas. Los centros comerciales están en toda el área suburbana en sitios como Blackpool, Ballincollig, Douglas, Wilton y Mahon Point. Hay otros en el centro de la ciudad, que están desarrollándose para rivalizar con los suburbios: The Cornmarket Centre en Cornmarket Street (previsto para otoño de 2007); la propuesta en Academy Street y el plan en el Grand Parade para construir el Capitol Cineplex, el primer multicines de Irlanda que no está en Dublín.
    La principal calle comercial es St. Patrick, y la más cara por metro cuadrado de Irlanda después de la calle Grafton de Dublín. Otras áreas comerciales del centro de la ciudad son la calle Oliver Plunkett y Grand Parade.


    Industry & Commerce
    It is also home to the Heineken Brewery which also brews Murphy's Irish Stout and the nearby Beamish and Crawford brewery (recently taken over by Heineken) which have been in the city for generations.
    And for many years, Cork was the home to Ford Motor Company, which manufactured cars in the docklands area before the plant was closed.
    Henry Ford's grandfather was from West Cork, which was one of the main reason for opening up the manufacturing facility in Cork.
    But technology has replaced the old manufacturing businesses of the 1970s and 1980s, with people now working in the many I.T. centres of the city.
    Ferry
    The Cross River Ferry, from Rushbrooke to Passage West, links the R624 to R610. This service is useful when trying to avoid traffic congestion in Jack Lynch tunnel and Dunkettle area. Cork Ferry port is situated at Ringaskiddy, 16 km SE via the N28. A direct sea link is available to Roscoff (France) with Brittany Ferries. A long-established link with Swansea in Wales is currently out of service but it is widely hoped will be reinstated in 2008. A connecting bus service is available from the ferryport to the city centre. Plans for a water taxi service are being finalised to provide traffic free connections for both commuters and tourists alike.

    External links
    Wikimedia Commons / Cork
    Cork (city) travel guide from Wikitravel
    Cork City Council site (including strategic plan and housing strategy)
    The Peoples Republic Of Cork
    Architecture of Cork
    Port of Cork
    A Dictionary of Cork Slang
    St Finbarre's Cathedral
    Church of St. Anne Shandon
    Discover Ireland - Cork - The English Market
    Wikimedia Commons / Cork
    Cork City Council
    Guía Turística de Cork
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    Start your holiday in Cork!
    Cork is a great place to begin your campervan holiday. The roads are quieter and we will collect you from the Airport http://www.corkairport.com. We can also arrange for you to collect your Campervan/Motorhome at Shannon Airport, http://www.shannonairport.com , or Kerry Airport http://www.kerryairport.ie .
    Our Motor home depot is situated near the ferry port.Brittany ferries operate a service from Cork to Roscoff in France https://www.brittanyferries.ie/ Cork has so much to offer we’ve put this page together to give you a sample of what’s available. For Campsites see Camping-ireland.ie http://www.camping-ireland.ie./cork/cork.html.
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    Cork is one of the most scenic counties in Ireland, with a wonderful combination of coastline, inlets, mountains and other scenic areas.
    The county has it's own anthem, namely, 'The banks of my own lovely Lee', or 'The Banks' as it is known locally.
    Cork even has it's own stout called Murphys, very similar in appearance to Guinness.
    Cork, known as the 'Rebel County', is located at the South West corner of Ireland.
    Cork is the country's largest county, Capital of the South, but considered by Southerners to be the Real Capital.
    Main Tourist Attractions
    · Argideen Heritage - Clonakilty
    Located on a 135 acre Dairy Farm, which is located just off of the R600 between Clonakilty and Timoleague in South West Cork. The Arigideen River Valley is unique as well as being beautiful in that it has a very high concentration of Historical sites and is a great source of folklore. The Valley has connections with Michael Collins, Henry Ford, John F Kennedy, Jeremiah O'Donovan Rossa, Donal Cam O' Sullivan Bere and William Penn to mention just a few
    · Ballincollig Gunpowder Mills - Ballincollig
    Ballincollig Gunpowder Mills Heritage Centre is a unique industrial complex which meanders along the bank of the River Lee. The Mills were established in 1794 by Charles Henry Leslie. Eleven years later when Napoleon's control of France posed a grave threat to the British, the British Board of Ordnance bought the Mills from Leslie. Along with this the Army Barracks was built in the town to protect the supply of gunpowder. By the mid 1800s the Mills were one of the largest industrial establishments in the Cork area.
    · Blarney Castle - Home of the Blarney Stone - Blarney
    Blarney Castle is one of Ireland's oldest and most historic castles. It was built around 1446. An ancient stronghold of the MacCarthys, Lords of Muskerry and one of the strongest fortresses in Munster, its walls are eighteen feet thick in places. Located on the parapet of the castle is the famous "Blarney Stone". According to local legend, after kissing this stone, you will have the gift of eternal eloquence, or "the gift of the gab". To kiss the stone, you must first lie on your back, then leaning your head backwards and downwards, you kiss the underside of the stone. The last admission to the castle and grounds is 30 minutes before closing.
    · Cobh Heritage Centre - Cobh
    Located in the town of Cobh. The story of Cobhs unique origins and its legacy are dramatically recalled at The Queenstown Story, a multi media exhibition at Cobhs restored Victorian Railway Station. Retrace the steps of the 2.5 million Irish people who emigrated from the port of Cobh, experience conditions aboard the emigrant vessels and learn about the dramatic events surrounding the Lusitania and the Titanic - Cobh was its last port of call.
    · Fota Wildlife Park - Carrigtwohill
    Fota wildlife Park is located at Carrigtwohill. This is an ideal family day out. Come face to face with over 90 species of exotic wildlife. Appreciate endangered animals such as cheetahs, oryx and lion tailed macaques in tranquil surroundings and see conservation in action. Fotas primary aim is the conservation and breeding of endangered species.
    · French Armada Centre - Bantry
    Located in the town of Bantry. Part of the epic adventure of 1796 courtesy of an individual audio tour with accompanying music and sound effects, available in a choice of languages. The centrepiece of this exhibition is a giant 1:6 scale model of a frigate in cross section. Vividly illustrating life in the French Navy 200 years ago, it illustrates the ship's construction and various activities as they happened on board. The exhibition centre is both very educational and entertaining.
    · Longueville House - Blackwater
    Longueville House is situated in the heart of a 500 acre Wooded Estate, overlooks the Blackwater River Valley, famous for its Salmon and Brown Trout fishing. The House, a listed Heritage Georgian Manor, is owned and managed by the O'Callaghan Family. Longuevilles history is that of Ireland in miniature. Longueville, after 300 years is now in O'Callaghan ownership.
    · Michael Collins Centre - Clonakilty
    The Michael Collins Centre, located in Clomakilty. One of the great heroes of the 1916-1922 period, was born at Woodfield, near Clonakilty. He was General of the Free State Army and a legend in his own lifetime. The small West Cork Museum has many mementos of the hero.
    · Millstreet Country Park - Killarney
    Millstreet Country Park en route to Killarney is renowned for its breathtaking landscape and theme gardens with rare shrubs, flowers, herb rich meadows, wetlands and boglands. There are reminders of many aspects of Irish History within the Park - the 4000 year old Stone Circle and Fullacht Fiadh, the 10,000 year old Glacier Boulders (erratics) and the more recent Shepherds Hut. You will find seven hundred red deer roaming the paddocks and many species of birds and wild life.
    · Mizen Head Signal Station - Mizen
    Mizen Head Signal Station is now open to the public for the first time since it was completed in 1910. The Mizen Vision visitor centre in the keeper's house, along with the engine room, famous suspension bridge, 99 steps and views up the south and west coasts combine with the exhilaration of the Atlantic and ancient rocks to guarantee a unique experienc
    · Old Midleton Distillery - Cork
    A tour of The Old Midleton Distillery takes you on a journey through the story of Irish whiskey via an audio-visual presentation, available in six languages. Follow the old distillery trail through mills, maltings, corn stores, stillhouse, warehouses and kilns. View the largest pot in the world prior to sampling the renowned Jameson Whiskey in the bar. On offer too is an opportunity to become a qualified Irish Whiskey taster, with presentation of certificate.
    · Riverstown House - Cork
    Riverstown House, dating from 1602 and rebuilt in 1745, is home to some fine plasterwork by the Francini brothers. The house was originally the seat of Dr. Jemmett Browne, Bishop of Cork. Features of the house include the Francini Room which has some highly obscure plasterwork and the Green Drawing Room which is notable for its exceptionally fine timber carved fireplace.
    · Saint Finbarre's Cathedral - Cork
    Saint Finbarre's Cathedral is one of the most beautiful and interesting in the country. It was completed in 1870 and it is the latest in a series of places of worship located on the site where Saint Fin Barre himself is said to have founded his school of learning in the seventeenth century. The cathedral is filled with highly ornamented, beautiful mosaic work, rich carvings and fine stained glass.
    · Skibbereen Heritage Centre - Skibbereeb
    Located the beautifully restored Old Gasworks building, in Skibbereen, one of West Cork's picturesque towns, the Centre consists of two themes. The Great Famine Commemoration Exhibition commemorates the Great Irish Famine of the 1840's, known as the Great Hunger. Skibbereen was one of the worst affected areas, and the events of the era are depicted using local characters and events. The Lough Hyne Interpretive Centre explains the unique nature of this salt water marine lake, Ireland's first Marine Nature Reserve.
    · The English Market - Cork
    This indoor covered market is owned by Cork Corporation and is situated on the Grand Parade. There is access from the Grand Parade, Oliver Plunkett Street, Princes Street and Patrick Street. The market sells a huge variety of meats, poultry, cheeses, vegetables, breads, fresh and organic herbs.
    · The West Cork Model Railway Village - Clonakilty
    Located at The Station, Inchydoney Road, in the West Cork town of Clonakilty. This is the first of its kind in Ireland. It allows the visitor to experience the sights and sounds of life in West Cork during the 1940s. The working railway, a model of the long closed West Cork line, is at the core of the experience. Many of the industrial buildings reconstructed in the village had their own system of power generation during the era.
    Heritage Sites
    · Barryscourt Castle - Carrigtwohill
    Barryscourt Castle was the seat of the Barry family from the 12th to the 17th centuries. The present castle is a fine example of a 15th century tower house with 16th century additions and alterations. The bawn wall with three corner towers is largely intact. The ground floor of the keep houses an exhibition on the history of the Barrys and Barryscourt Castle.
    · Charles Fort - Summer Cove - Kinsale
    Constructed in the late 17th century on the site of an earlier coastal fortification, Charles Fort is a classic example of a star-shaped fort. William Robinson, architect of the Royal Hospital in Kilmainham, Dublin, and Superintendent of Fortifications, is credited with designing the Fort. As one of the largest military forts in the country, Charles Fort has been associated with some of the most momentous events in Irish history. The most significant of which include the Williamite War in 1690 and the Irish Civil War of 1922-23.
    · Desmond Castle (French Prison) - Kinsale
    Built as a custom house by the Earl of Desmond c. AD 1500, Desmond Castle has a colourful history, ranging from Spanish occupation in 1601 to use as a prison for captured American sailors during the American War of Independence. Known locally as 'The French Prison' after a tragic fire in which 54 prisoners, mainly French seamen, died in 1747. The Castle was also used as a borough jail from 1791 to the onset of the Great Famine when it was used as an auxiliary workhouse tending to the starving populace.
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    ¿Lo sabía?
    El desfile de San Patricio más pequeño del mundo tiene lugar en Dripsey, Condado de Cork. Dura sólo 25 metros y ¡va de un pub... a otro
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    Cork
    Ubicado en el suroeste de irlanda, el Condado de Cork es el condado más grande de toda la isla. Espectacular paisajes, cultura, historia, herencia cultural y playas destacdas por su calidad, el Condado de Cork tiene todo.
    Ubicado en el suroeste de irlanda, el Condado de Cork es el condado más grande de toda la isla. Espectacular paisajes, cultura, historia, herencia cultural y playas destacdas por su calidad, el Condado de Cork tiene todo.
    Poco después de llegar a Cork se dará cuenta porqué es conocido como el condado gourmet de Irlanda. Con mariscos tan frescos que brillan, mercados de productos agrícolas que ofrecen excelentes productos de la zona, y un montón de restaurantes aclamados por la crítica, nunca estará muy lejos de algo bien apetitoso.
    El oeste de Cork exhibe algunos de los paisajes más excepcionales de Irlanda, con una agreste costa y amplias playas de arena dorada, el norte del condado es muy famoso por la amabilidad de su gente y el este por su ambiente relajada. El Condado de Cork te está esperando.
    El Condado de Cork ofrece una gran cantidad de actividades para toda la familia, con muchos sitios turísticos y muchos festivales y eventos.
    East Cork Tourism
    West Cork Tourism
    Cork World Book Festival
    Cork International Choral Festival
    CLARION HOTEL - 2 nights B and B
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    Cork is Ireland's third city and has always been an important seaport. Today the River Lee flows through the city in 2 main channels, so that you find yourself constantly crossing bridges. Some of the main streets are built over channels where ships nuzzled their anchor chains a century ago. The best way to see what the city has to offer is to go by foot.
    County Cork is located in the Southwest of Ireland. It is Ireland's largest county in terms of area and contains the island's third largest city, Cork City. Much of County Cork is dominated by the Atlantic Ocean. Visitor attractions in County Cork include The Old Midleton Distillery, Blarney Castle, the Beamish and Crawford Brewery, Fota Wildlife Park, and Bantry House and Gardens. Cork is easily accessible from the rest of Ireland and by ferry and plane. Popular places to stay outside of Cork City but in County Cork are Youghal, Kinsale, Schull, Bandon, Bantry, Skibbereen and Blarney.
    http://www.whiskeytours.ie
    http://www.blarneycastle.ie/
    Map Showing Blarney Castle
    http://www.beamish.ie
    http://www.fotawildlife.ie/
    http://www.bantryhouse.com/
    Cork
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  4. #1664
    Usuario Avatar de Nettus
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    01 feb, 08
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    Lundby
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    Predeterminado Cork

    Cork
    Cork is one of the most scenic counties in Ireland, with a wonderful combination of coastline, inlets, mountains and other scenic areas.
    The county has it's own anthem, namely, 'The banks of my own lovely Lee', or 'The Banks' as it is known locally.
    Cork even has it's own stout called Murphys, very similar in appearance to Guinness.
    Cork, known as the 'Rebel County', is located at the South West corner of Ireland.
    Cork is the country's largest county, Capital of the South, but considered by Southerners to be the Real Capital.
    Main Tourist Attractions
    · Argideen Heritage - Clonakilty
    Located on a 135 acre Dairy Farm, which is located just off of the R600 between Clonakilty and Timoleague in South West Cork. The Arigideen River Valley is unique as well as being beautiful in that it has a very high concentration of Historical sites and is a great source of folklore. The Valley has connections with Michael Collins, Henry Ford, John F Kennedy, Jeremiah O'Donovan Rossa, Donal Cam O' Sullivan Bere and William Penn to mention just a few
    · Ballincollig Gunpowder Mills - Ballincollig
    Ballincollig Gunpowder Mills Heritage Centre is a unique industrial complex which meanders along the bank of the River Lee. The Mills were established in 1794 by Charles Henry Leslie.

    Eleven years later when Napoleon's control of France posed a grave threat to the British, the British Board of Ordnance bought the Mills from Leslie. Along with this the Army Barracks was built in the town to protect the supply of gunpowder. By the mid 1800s the Mills were one of the largest industrial establishments in the Cork area.
    · Blarney Castle - Home of the Blarney Stone - Blarney
    Blarney Castle is one of Ireland's oldest and most historic castles. It was built around 1446. An ancient stronghold of the MacCarthys, Lords of Muskerry and one of the strongest fortresses in Munster, its walls are eighteen feet thick in places.

    Located on the parapet of the castle is the famous "Blarney Stone". According to local legend, after kissing this stone, you will have the gift of eternal eloquence, or "the gift of the gab". To kiss the stone, you must first lie on your back, then leaning your head backwards and downwards, you kiss the underside of the stone. The last admission to the castle and grounds is 30 minutes before closing.
    · Cobh Heritage Centre - Cobh
    Cobh Heritage Centre
    www.ttrn.com/grassrootscolleenfliednercobhire...
    Located in the town of Cobh. The story of Cobhs unique origins and its legacy are dramatically recalled at The Queenstown Story, a multi media exhibition at Cobhs restored Victorian Railway Station.
    Retrace the steps of the 2.5 million Irish people who emigrated from the port of Cobh, experience conditions aboard the emigrant vessels and learn about the dramatic events surrounding the Lusitania and the Titanic - Cobh was its last port of call.
    · Fota Wildlife Park - Carrigtwohill
    Fota wildlife Park is located at Carrigtwohill. This is an ideal family day out. Come face to face with over 90 species of exotic wildlife. Appreciate endangered animals such as cheetahs, oryx and lion tailed macaques in tranquil surroundings and see conservation in action. Fotas primary aim is the conservation and breeding of endangered species.
    · French Armada Centre - Bantry
    Located in the town of Bantry. Part of the epic adventure of 1796 courtesy of an individual audio tour with accompanying music and sound effects, available in a choice of languages. The centrepiece of this exhibition is a giant 1:6 scale model of a frigate in cross section.
    Vividly illustrating life in the French Navy 200 years ago, it illustrates the ship's construction and various activities as they happened on board. The exhibition centre is both very educational and entertaining.
    · Longueville House - Blackwater
    Longueville House is situated in the heart of a 500 acre Wooded Estate, overlooks the Blackwater River Valley, famous for its Salmon and Brown Trout fishing. The House, a listed Heritage Georgian Manor, is owned and managed by the O'Callaghan Family. Longuevilles history is that of Ireland in miniature. Longueville, after 300 years is now in O'Callaghan ownership.
    · Michael Collins Centre - Clonakilty
    The Michael Collins Centre, located in Clomakilty. One of the great heroes of the 1916-1922 period, was born at Woodfield, near Clonakilty. He was General of the Free State Army and a legend in his own lifetime. The small West Cork Museum has many mementos of the hero.
    · Millstreet Country Park - Killarney
    Millstreet Country Park en route to Killarney is renowned for its breathtaking landscape and theme gardens with rare shrubs, flowers, herb rich meadows, wetlands and boglands. There are reminders of many aspects of Irish History within the Park - the 4000 year old Stone Circle and Fullacht Fiadh, the 10,000 year old Glacier Boulders (erratics) and the more recent Shepherds Hut. You will find seven hundred red deer roaming the paddocks and many species of birds and wild life.
    · Mizen Head Signal Station - Mizen
    Mizen head -
    Mizen Head Signal Station is now open to the public for the first time since it was completed in 1910. The Mizen Vision visitor centre in the keeper's house, along with the engine room, famous suspension bridge, 99 steps and views up the south and west coasts combine with the exhilaration of the Atlantic and ancient rocks to guarantee a unique experienc

    · Old Midleton Distillery - Cork
    A tour of The Old Midleton Distillery takes you on a journey through the story of Irish whiskey via an audio-visual presentation, available in six languages. Follow the old distillery trail through mills, maltings, corn stores, stillhouse, warehouses and kilns. View the largest pot in the world prior to sampling the renowned Jameson Whiskey in the bar. On offer too is an opportunity to become a qualified Irish Whiskey taster, with presentation of certificate.
    · Riverstown House - Cork
    Riverstown House, dating from 1602 and rebuilt in 1745, is home to some fine plasterwork by the Francini brothers. The house was originally the seat of Dr. Jemmett Browne, Bishop of Cork. Features of the house include the Francini Room which has some highly obscure plasterwork and the Green Drawing Room which is notable for its exceptionally fine timber carved fireplace.
    · Saint Finbarre's Cathedral - Cork
    Saint Finbarre's Cathedral is one of the most beautiful and interesting in the country. It was completed in 1870 and it is the latest in a series of places of worship located on the site where Saint Fin Barre himself is said to have founded his school of learning in the seventeenth century. The cathedral is filled with highly ornamented, beautiful mosaic work, rich carvings and fine stained glass.
    · Skibbereen Heritage Centre - Skibbereeb
    Located the beautifully restored Old Gasworks building, in Skibbereen, one of West Cork's picturesque towns, the Centre consists of two themes. The Great Famine Commemoration Exhibition commemorates the Great Irish Famine of the 1840's, known as the Great Hunger. Skibbereen was one of the worst affected areas, and the events of the era are depicted using local characters and events. The Lough Hyne Interpretive Centre explains the unique nature of this salt water marine lake, Ireland's first Marine Nature Reserve.
    · The English Market - Cork
    This indoor covered market is owned by Cork Corporation and is situated on the Grand Parade. There is access from the Grand Parade, Oliver Plunkett Street, Princes Street and Patrick Street. The market sells a huge variety of meats, poultry, cheeses, vegetables, breads, fresh and organic herbs.

    A sightseeing "train" which runs from the West Cork Model Railway Village around Clonakilty Town (© 2007 Clonakilty.biz)
    · The West Cork Model Railway Village - Clonakilty
    Located at The Station, Inchydoney Road, in the West Cork town of Clonakilty. This is the first of its kind in Ireland. It allows the visitor to experience the sights and sounds of life in West Cork during the 1940s. The working railway, a model of the long closed West Cork line, is at the core of the experience. Many of the industrial buildings reconstructed in the village had their own system of power generation during the era.
    Heritage Sites
    · Barryscourt Castle - Carrigtwohill
    Barryscourt Castle was the seat of the Barry family from the 12th to the 17th centuries. The present castle is a fine example of a 15th century tower house with 16th century additions and alterations. The bawn wall with three corner towers is largely intact. The ground floor of the keep houses an exhibition on the history of the Barrys and Barryscourt Castle.
    · Charles Fort - Summer Cove - Kinsale
    Constructed in the late 17th century on the site of an earlier coastal fortification, Charles Fort is a classic example of a star-shaped fort.


    William Robinson, architect of the Royal Hospital in Kilmainham, Dublin, and Superintendent of Fortifications, is credited with designing the Fort. As one of the largest military forts in the country, Charles Fort has been associated with some of the most momentous events in Irish history. The most significant of which include the Williamite War in 1690 and the Irish Civil War of 1922-23.
    · Desmond Castle (French Prison) - Kinsale
    Built as a custom house by the Earl of Desmond c. AD 1500, Desmond Castle has a colourful history, ranging from Spanish occupation in 1601 to use as a prison for captured American sailors during the American War of Independence. Known locally as 'The French Prison' after a tragic fire in which 54 prisoners, mainly French seamen, died in 1747. The Castle was also used as a borough jail from 1791 to the onset of the Great Famine when it was used as an auxiliary workhouse tending to the starving populace.

  5. #1665
    Usuario Avatar de Nettus
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    01 feb, 08
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    Lundby
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    Predeterminado Kerry

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    17. Condado: Kerry - Capital: Tralee
    Province:Munster - Area:4,746 km2 - Population: 145.000 - www.kerrycoco.ie

    www.dragonseye.com/ireland/day5. - www.kerrycoco.ie/heritage/map.htm
    Some of the Heritage Sites in Kerry
    1-Lislaughtin Abbey - Franciscan - 2-Listowel Castle - 3-Ratoo Round Tower-
    4-Carrigafoyle Castle - 5-Ardfert - Friary, Cathedral and Churches -
    6-Tralee Bay - Bird Sanctuary
    7-Rathass Church - 8-Annagh Church - 9-Natterjack Toad - Castlegregory
    10-Mount Brandon - noted for it's number of and diversity of plant species e.g. Lady's Mantle Cloghane/Brandon areas - Sustainable development award winning area-
    11-Kilmalkedar Oratory - 12-Gallarus Oratory -
    13-Dúnbeg Fort - one of the finest coastal promontory forts in Ireland
    14-Garfinny Bridge
    15-Minard Beach & Castle - one of the best examples of a storm beach in Ireland
    -16-Beehive Huts
    17-Slea Head - is the best part of the country for viewing Dolphins, Whales & Porpoises
    18-Tearaght Island - Bird sanctury -// Blasket Islands - a major Grey Seal breeding ground
    19-Castlemaine Harbour - Ecology & Birdwatching
    20-Killarney National Park, Muckross Friary, Ross Castle
    21-Courtneys Bat site - Killarney National Park - 22-Leacanabuaile Fort
    23-Derrynane National Park -
    24-Staigue Fort - well preserved example
    25-Stone Circle - in Kenmare
    Puffin Island - Birdwatch Ireland reserve
    Valentia Island - is a Tetrapod tractway internationally recognised as being of major geological importance.
    Common Seal - harbours in Kenmare Bay
    Skellig Bheag - internationally recognised Gannet colony
    Great Skellig - World Heritage Site
    26-Uragh Wood - Hyper-oceanic woodland

    "At Caherciveen we caught the ferry to Valentia, an island about 7 miles long and 3 miles wide, bordered by Dingle Bay to the north and Portmagee Channel to the south. It has a grand old slate quarry on the northeast end of the island, an isolated lighthouse and granite challenging the angry Atlantic on the north shore, and glorious, crumbling cliffs to the southwest..."
    www.gonomad.com/destinations/0508/valentia.html

    El Condado de Kerry (en irlandés: Ciarraí) se encuentra en el suroeste de Irlanda, en la provincia de Munster.
    Se lo conoce informalmente como El Reino (The Kingdom). Ocupa una extensión de 4.746 km².La capital es Tralee.
    El condado es famoso por una ruta llamada "Ring of Kerry" (el anillo de Kerry), donde se pueden contemplar alguno de los más bellos paisajes de la isla. El condado también es sede de uno de los equipos de fútbol gaélico más importantes del país. El condado limita con el Condado de Limerick (este) y el Condado de Cork (sureste).
    One of Ireland's most famous towns, Killarney, is located in Kerry. The Lakes of Killarney, an area of outstanding natural beauty, are located in Killarney National Park. The tip of the Dingle Peninsula is the most westerly point of both mainland Ireland and Europe. Likewise, Fenit, the port ofTralee, is the most westerly commercial shipping port in Europe.
    History -
    Geography
    Kerry faces the Atlantic Ocean and, typically for an Atlantic coastal region, features many peninsulas and inlets: principally the Dingle Peninsula, the Iveragh Peninsula, and the Beara Peninsula, shared with neighbouring County Cork. The county is bounded on the west by the Atlantic Ocean and on the north by the River Shannon.
    The Ring of Kerry on the Iveragh Peninsula is a popular route for tourists and cyclists. The pedestrian version is the scenic Kerry Way which follows ancient paths generally higher than that adopted by the Ring of Kerry.
    Kerry contains two of the three highest mountains in Ireland, Carrauntoohil, part of the Macgillycuddy's Reeks range and Mount Brandon, part of the Slieve Mish range.
    The Lakes of Killarney in the centre of the county are a scenic tourist attraction.
    Just off Kerry's coast are a number of islands, including the Blasket Islands, Valentia Island and the Skelligs. Skellig Michael is a World Heritage Site, famous for the medievalmonastery clinging to the island's cliffs.
    Kerry contains the extreme west point of Ireland Dunmore Head on the Dingle Peninsula, or including islands, Tearaght Island, part of the Blaskets. The most westerly inhabited area of Ireland is Dunquin, on the Dingle Peninsula.
    The River Feale, the River Laune and the Roughty River flow through Kerry, into the Atlantic.

    Blennerville windmill
    Towns and parishes
    Abbeydorney - Annascaul - Ardfert - Ballinskelligs - Ballybunion - Ballyduff - Baile an Fheirtéaraigh - Ballyheigue - Ballylongford - Ballymacelligott - Brosna - Caherdaniel - Cahersiveen - Castlecove - Castlegregory - Castleisland - Castlemaine - Causeway - Ceann Trá - An Coireán - Cordal - Currans - Currow - Derrymore - Derrynane - An Daingean - Duagh - Dún Chaoin - Farranfore - Fenit - An Fheothanach - Finuge - Glenbeigh - Gneeveguilla - Kenmare - Kilflynn - Kilgarvan - Killarney - Killorglin - Kilmoyley - Knightstown - Knocknagoshel - Lios Póil - Lisselton - Listowel - Lixnaw - Milltown - Moyvane - Portmagee - Rathmore - Scartaglen - Sneem - Tarbert

    Tuosist - Valentia Island - Ard na Caithne - Sliabh Luachra, a border region of Kerry, County Cork and County Limerick known for Irish traditional music
    Corca Dhuibhne (the Dingle Peninsula), a Gaeltacht region Bounard.
    Transport
    Road
    Kerry is accessible by road, rail, sea and air. The main National Primary Routes into Kerry are the N21 road and the N69 road from Limerick and the N22 road from Cork each terminating in Tralee. The N23 road from Castleisland to Farranfore also connects these roads. Within Kerry, the well-known Ring of Kerry follows the N70 road, a National Secondary Route which circles the Iveragh Peninsula and links at Kenmare with the N71 road to west Cork. Bus Eireann operates an extensive bus service network on routes throughout the county with connection hubs in Killarney and Tralee. Also in County Kerry, the N86 road connects Tralee with Dingle, from Dingle you can take the R559 ring road to reach Sybil Point, which is one of the most westernly fringes of County Kerry and indeed the south of Ireland. Kerry airport is situated on the N22 in Farranfore just south of Tralee and north of Killarney.
    Sea
    Fenit harbour near Tralee is a regional harbour capable of handling ships of up to 17,000 tonnes. Large container cranes from Liebherrs in Killarney are regularly exported worldwide. A rail-link to the port was closed in the 1970s. The harbour at Dingle is one of Ireland's secondary fishing ports. In the north of the county, a ferry service operates from Tarbert, to Killimer in County Clare.
    See also: :Category:Transport in Kerry
    Attractions
    Kerry, with its mountains, lakes and Atlantic coastline is among the most scenic areas in Ireland and is among the most significant tourist destinations in Ireland. Killarney is the centre of the tourism industry, which is a significant element of the economy in Kerry.
    The Kerry Way, Dingle Way and Beara Way are walking routes in the county.
    Attractions include:
    Lakes of Killarney - Ring of Kerry - Carrauntoohil - Mount Brandon - Blasket Islands - Fenit Harbour - Uragh Stone Circle
    Historic sites of Kerry:
    Eightercua - Muckross House - Ross Castle - Gallarus Oratory - Skellig Michael - Scotia's Grave
    Ecclesiastical sites at Ardfert
    Rattoo Round Tower
    See also
    List of abbeys and priories in the Republic of Ireland (County Kerry)
    External links
    Kerry County Council
    County Kerry Atlas
    Abadía de Muckross
    Aeropuerto de Kerry
    Wikimedia Commons / County Kerry
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    Capital:Tralee
    Tralee Guide | Tralee Map, Photos and Things to do in Tralee
    Coordenadas: 52° 16′ 0.12″ N, 9° 43′ 0.12″ O
    Tralee (Trá Lí en irlandés), es la capital del Condado de Kerry, en Irlanda, situada al suroeste de la isla. Tiene unos 22.556 habitantes (censo 2006) y fue fundada en el siglo XII por los anglo-normandos. Se encuentra a unos 90 km al noroeste de la ciudad sureña de Cork. Es un centro turístico e industrial unido al mar por medio de un canal. La ciudad está emplazada en la bahía de Tralee, con vistas al mar y las montañas que se extienden hacia el oeste. Roger Casement (1864-1916), funcionario consular británico, fue capturado en 1916 en el fuerte de McKenna, un terraplén en la bahía de Tralee, cuando desembarcó allí después de haber intentado obtener ayuda de los alemanes para los nacionalistas irlandeses durante la Primera Guerra Mundial. Fue ejecutado por traición en Londres. Toma su nombre del río Lee, que desemboca en la bahía de Tralee. La ciudad posee numerosos monumentos que constituyen el testigo de sus más de ocho siglos de historia, como el Kerry The Kingdom Museum, iglesia de Saint John, el Town Park, el Siamsa Tíre Theatre donde se realizan importantes espectáculos de folclore irlandés. A finales de agosto, se celebra en la ciudad el "Rose of Tralee Festival", que es uno de los más importantes de Irlanda en el cual participan chicas de las comunidades irlandesas de todo el mundo.
    Tralee es famosa sin duda en toda la isla por albergar el festival "Rose of Tralee", que tiene lugar a finales de Agosto, donde se encuentran singulares bandas, baile y la elección de la "rosa" de la región",un bonito concuro de belleza para las jovenes de la zona.
    El mayor atractivo de la ciudad es el County Kerry Museum, con un bonito parque temático "Kerry el reino". En Tralee también se encuentra el teatro Folklórico "Siamsa Tire", en honor al mejor embajador de la cultura irlandesa, durante el verano se celebran representaciones de danza y canciones populares. A la salida de Tralee se haya el "Blennerville Windmill", el mayor molino del país aún en funcionamiento y construido en 1800. Un bonito ferrocarril de vapor une Blennerville y Tralee.
    Tralee además constituye la puerta de entrada a la Península Dingle, uno de los lugares más bellos de la isla, donde se rodó la película, La hija de Ryan.
    A través de este rincón de Irlanda solían establecerse los principales cauces de comunicación con la Europa Continental. Al Condado de Kerry se le conoce como el "Reino" por su tradición independentista y su rivalidad con los dublineses. Es por otra parte la ciudad más hospitalaria de Irlanda, orgulloso de poseer en su región algunos de los paisajes más bellos y espectaculares de Irlanda.
    A la ciudad se puede llegar en tren o autobús desde Cork o Dublín. Existe también un aeropuerto en el condado, el aeropuerto de Kerry, donde principalmente operan las compañías Ryanair y AerArann. También se encuentra cerca el Aeropuerto de Cork.
    Además la ciudad de Tralee posee su propio puerto, el Fenit Harbour. Su objetivo principal es prestar servicios portuarios de flota pesquera y dispone de instalaciones de manipulación de carga industrial. E puerto ofrece numerosos atraques para embarcaciones de casi todos los tamaños.
    La Rosa de Tralee
    Si hay un acontecimiento especial e importante en Irlanda, es el que sucede cada agosto en la ciudad de Tralee, donde cada año y desde 1959 se elige a la Rosa de entre la comunidad irlandesa de todo el mundo. Las candidatas no solo deben ser de belleza física sino poseer también otras cualidades y al final del dia este no es más que un concurso de belleza, aunque su historia viene de lejos. El Festival en tralee incluye ferias, cabalgatas y conciertos y no es solo un acontecimiento social sino uno muy popular, con dos programas de Tv en la cadena RTE nacional que mostrara las "cualidades" de las candidatas cuya Rosa sera elegida para representar la belleza nacional, o descendiente de ella.

    Turismo
    Tralee es un importante destino turístico donde se han invertido 55 millones de euros en los últimos años. La ciudad cuenta con excelentes instalaciones de alojamiento. Los hoteles de la zona están muy bien equipados con comodidades modernas.La ciudad también tiene algunos grandes restaurantes.Además la ciudad también tiene algunos excelentes centros comerciales donde se pueden comprar hermosos recuerdos. Tralee tiene buenas instalaciones deportivas. El Aquadome Tralee es una de las mayores y más modernas instalaciones de ocio con varias piscinas, cañones de agua, rios, géiseres. Además la ciudad cuenta con un gran campo de golf. En la actualidad Tralee es una ciudad moderna que ha crecido a la par con la economía irlandesa durante los últimos años y ahora mismo es un bullicioso centro urbano. Tralee está rodeada por una abundancia de amenidades naturales como los bellos paisajes y magníficas playas para así poder disfrutar de muchas actividades al aire libre. La eficaz gestión del tráfico y las excelentes instalaciones de aparcamiento han reducido la congestión del tráfico a lo más mínimo así como la eliminación de los retrasos que suele producirse en las grandes ciudades.
    Places of interest
    Kerry County Museum – incorporating the theme park 'Kerry: The Kingdom' and an exhibit which depicts life in medieval Geraldine Tralee.
    Siamsa Tíre – Ireland's National Folk Theatre, offering traditional music and plays in Irish.
    Blennerville Windmill located about 2 km outside the town, Ireland's largest still functioning windmill.
    Tralee Aquadome – A large indoor water leisure facility with a mini-golf course, located near Fels point, just off the Dan Spring road, at the Western exit from the town. The Slieve Mish Mountains range acts as a pretty backdrop to the site.
    Tralee-Dingle Railway – Departures also take place from the Aquadome site for trips on the restored part of the old Tralee to Dingle Railway. Local enthusiasts have brought back an original Hunslet steam engine from the USA to relive the days when the Tralee to Dingle line carried goods and passengers along the famous narrow-gauge picturesque route before it was finally closed in 1953. Visitors can take a short train ride in carriages imported from Spain pulled by the puffing Hunslet a few kilometres out to the Tralee Bay village of Blennerville. Here the restored Blennerville Windmill and Museum house a fascinating look into Tralee's historical past as a gateway to the new world in the 19th century. Nearby the Windmill stands the yard where the Jeanie Johnston wooden sailing ship replica was completed in 2002. The new Jeanie Johnston ship is now based in Dublin city docklands.
    Pubs en Tralee
    Irlanda es famosa por su cultura pub. En el centro de la ciudad de Tralee hay más de setenta pubs, algunos de ellos más bien tradicionales, otros de estilo más moderno. Pero todos ellos tienen algo en común: a la gente le gusta ir a estos lugares para conocer amigos y extraños y así tomar algunas bebidas juntos (principalmente cerveza), a menudo acompañada de música tradicional. Al menos una vez hay que aprovechar la oportunidad y pasar algún tiempo en uno de los pubs, por lo que representa de hecho una parte muy importante del estilo de vida gaélico. Uno de los pubs más populares de Tralee es el "Kirby's Inn Brogue" en la calle russell, en el centro de la ciudad, el cual tiene una fachada de lo más popular.
    See also
    List of abbeys and priories in Ireland (County Kerry)
    List of towns and villages in Ireland
    Market Houses in Ireland
    Tralee Bay
    External links
    Tralee – Official website
    Institute of Technology, Tralee
    County Kerry Atlas
    Tralee Photo Gallery
    Wikimedia Commons / Tralee
    Rose of Tralee Festival
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    The 'Kingdom' has a maze of blissfully quiet country lanes each of which has a story to tell - Around every corner, a piece of history unfolds amidst the most beautiful of scenery.
    There are tiny fishing villages, early Christian ruins, and Irelands highest mountain. There is nothing quite like the exhilaration of travelling through quiet country roads and unspoilt villages off the beaten track.
    You will receive a warm welcome from the locals, who have all the time in the world to swap yarns with you.
    No matter from which direction the County of Kerry is approached, the great central spine of mountains draws the eye of the traveller like a great symphony draws an audience to a fitting climax. The relatively high mountains and narrow peninsulas conjure weather patterns, which change the face of the mountains, the surface of the water and the texture of the landscape by the minute.
    The fretted and deep bays created by the mighty Atlantic play tricks with the light and produce a magical quality, which intoxicates the senses.
    Relatively little industry ensures an environment which is the envy of Europe, producing a background against which every water and land based activity can be enjoyed to the full. The special culture of the largely agricultural people gives a unique feeling to the country and the warm welcome, which is spontaneously extended, will captivate the heart of any visitor.
    Kerry offers a great diversity of scenery, culture and leisure activities. There are many amenities, places of interest, sporting and leisure activities, festivals and other special events to experience. Sporting enthusiasts will find plenty to do, from golfing, cycling and equestrian, to a wide variety of water sports such as angling, sailing, diving, Windsurfing, etc. Kerry is also a Walker's and Climber's paradise with it's many long distance Walking Routes, National Parks and great Mountain Ranges.
    For those interested in history and archaeology there are many outstanding items of interest to be seen, and there are a number of Major Heritage Interpretative Centres, Open Farms, Museums, Castles, Houses and Gardens open to the public.

    Main Tourist Attractions
    · Carrigafoyle Castle - Ballylongford
    Located 2 miles North of Ballylongford in the channel between the mainland and Carrig Island. Carrigafoyle has had a stormy history and, although wrecked by a series of bloody sieges, remains a remarkable castle. Cleverly located between the high- and low-water marks on the shore of the Shannon Estuary, it comprises a large tower built towards the end of the fifteenth century by the O'Connors of Kerry. The tower has five storeys rising to a height of 86 feet and is beautifully constructed of specially selected small stones laid in neat courses.
    · Coolwood Wildlife Sanctuary and Zoo - Coolcaslagh
    Located at Coolcaslagh, about two miles from Killarney town. Situated on 50 acres, it is an ideal family venue with scenic walks, coffee shop, children's playground and the 3 acre children's zoo with a variety of exotic species
    · Crag Cave - Castleisland
    Located at Castleisland, Crag cave is a colourful wonderland of stalactites and stalactmites. Discovered in 1983 and thought to be over a million years old, it is a natural all weather attraction. Crag Cave is an ancient fossil cave system, older than mankind itself, within which can be seen the natural forces that created the complex and beautiful passages.
    · Dingle Ocean World - Dingle
    Located in Dingle, is Ireland's new spectacular Aquarium, overlooking the scenic Dingle Harbour, in County Kerry. OceanWorld reveals the fascinating species that live in the waters around the magnificent Dingle Peninsula. The experience is a journey through the Peninsula's ancient sea culture and its people's interaction with the sea from the pre-christian era to present times
    · Fungi the Dolphin - Dingle
    Since 1983, Fungi - a wild Bottlenose Dolphin, chose to make Dingle Harbour his home. Boat trips leave Dingle pier all day, every day, all year round to see Fungi, wild and free in his natural habitat.
    · Killarney Model Railway - Killarney
    Located at Beech Road, Killarney, will provide enjoyment for all the family. Scores of trains running on over a mile of track, transport you through the landmarks of Europe. There are thousands of tiny people depicting all walks of life and a day and night scene that will take your breath away
    · Lakes of Killarney - Killarney
    The three main lakes of Killarney occupy a broad valley stretching south between the mountains. The Lower, Middle and Upper lakes, all lie within the Killarney National Park. Spectacular scenery
    · Muckross House - Muckross
    Muckross House, Gardens and Traditional Farms are a fantastic experience for everyone. The House and its Gardens are kept magnificently, while the Farms show how farming used to be managed in more traditional times. Car and boat trips, as well as a craft workshop make for an eventful and enjoyable visit
    · Skellig Islands - Ballinskellig
    Boat trips to the Skellig Island run throughout the year, depending on the weather. The two Skellig islands, Skellig Michael and Small Skellig stand in the Atlantic Ocean 12km south west of Valentia. They are renowned for their scenery, seabird colonies and early Christian monastic architecture
    www.kps.ie/houses_sale.html
    · The Kenmare Heritage Centre - Kenmare
    Provides an insight into the history of the town. The centre's tour covers a wide range of historical themes from generations gone by. A feature of the centre is the Sound Tours, available to all visitors. A heritage trail from the centre follows this tour.
    · The Kerry Bog Village Museum - Glenbeigh
    Located in the Village at Glenbeigh on the magnificent Ring of Kerry is a unique rural attraction. It aims to recreate life in Ireland during the 1800's.
    · Valentia Observatory - Cahersiveen
    Located on the Waterville road, just a few miles from Cahersiveen, this is Irelands oldest synoptic weather station.. Weather observations are made each hour and transmitted by telex to Dublin. Many historic instruments originally used are on display at the Observatory.
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    ¿Lo sabía?
    La Colina de Tara es una de los tramos de Europa más antiguo, con tumbas y túmulos funerarios que datan de hace más de 4.000 años. ...
    La excursión nos ha llevado a un paisaje realmente especial. Desde hace milenios éste es un lugar de poder. Estamos caminando por la Colina de Tara (en irlandés ‘Teamhair na Rí’, ‘La Colina de los Reyes’). Un geógrafo diría que es una alargada elevación caliza de escasa altitud, situada cerca del río Boyne, en el condado de Meath, en la provincia histórica de Leinster. Un historiador añadiría que esta Colina fue el centro político y espiritual de la Irlanda celta y que probablemente también gozó con anterioridad de tanta importancia, tal como parecen señalar los hallazgos arqueológicos del Neolítico, así como la leyenda que sitúa a Tara como capital de los Tuatha Dé Danamm (un pueblo anterior a los celtas). En Innisfree ya nos hemos referido a este lugar al narrar las andanzas de Finn MacCumhail cuando Tara era la sede del Ard Rí (el Gran Rey de Irlanda).
    A nuestro alrededor se extienden numerosos monumentos antiguos, como Ráith na Rig (la Fortaleza de los Reyes, también conocida como el Recinto Real): se trata de una fortificación de la Edad del Hierro de casi 1.000 metros de circunferencia, en cuyo interior destacan dos anillos de piedras tangentes conocidos como Teach Chormaic (la Casa de Cormac) y Forradh (el Asiento Real). En el centro del Forradh, en la cima de la colina, se yergue la Lia Fáil (la Piedra del Destino), en la cual eran coronados los Grandes Reyes de Irlanda. La leyenda sugiere que la piedra debía rugir tres veces si el aspirante al trono era el verdadero rey.
    En Tara se encuentra también una pequeña tumba de corredor neolítica, conocida como Dumha na nGiall (el Montículo de los Rehenes), que data del año 2000 a.C. aproximadamente. Su corto pasillo está alineado con la puesta de sol del 8 de noviembre y del 4 de febrero, que son precisamente las fechas en las que se celebraban las antiguas fiestas célticas de Samhain e Imbolc. Este hecho ha abonado la polémica científica: ¿los celtas llegaron aquí antes de lo que se venía creyendo o las festividades celtas fueron heredadas de anteriores pobladores? Existe pues mucho misterio todavía en estas tierras.
    Entre otros monumentos, podemos destacar Ráith na Seanadh (el Anillo de los Sínodos), la Sala del Banquete (que parece ser en realidad una avenida ceremonial que conduce hacia el sitio en cuestión), las Trincheras en Pendiente y el Fuerte de Gráinne.
    Cuando los celtas establecieron su sede en la colina, ésta se convirtió en el lugar desde donde los reyes de Meath gobernaron la isla con un status casi divino. Junto a la influencia política como capital, Tara parece haber conservado una influencia religiosa que fue disminuyendo debido a la labor de San Patricio, el evangelizador de Irlanda. Sin embargo, el papel emblemático de Tara dentro de la política irlandesa sobrevivió al paso de los siglos: Durante la rebelión irlandesa de 1798 los United Irishmen (Irlandeses Unidos) establecieron un campamento en la colina, pero fueron atacados y derrotados por las tropas británicas el 26 de mayo en la denominada batalla de la Colina de Tara. La Lia Fáil fue movida entonces para marcar las tumbas de 400 rebeldes que murieron allí aquel día. Por otra parte, el 15 de agosto de 1843 el parlamentario Daniel O’Connell, líder del movimiento para la emancipación católica, convocó una manifestación en la Colina de Tara, que reunió a un millón de personas.
    Hoy Tara es un hermoso nombre con el que bautizar a las niñas en Irlanda, al igual que la familia de Escarlata O’Hara, protagonista de ‘Lo que el viento se llevó’, escogió el nombre de Tara para sus tierras en el viejo Sur de los Estados Unidos.
    La Colina de Tara « Innisfree
    Colina de Tara - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
    Rutheando: LA COLINA DE TARA
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  6. #1666
    Usuario Avatar de Nettus
    Fecha de ingreso
    01 feb, 08
    Ubicación
    Lundby
    Mensajes
    4,725

    Predeterminado Limerick

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    18. Condado: Limerick - Capital: Limerick
    Province: Munster - Area: 2,686 km2 - Population: ~ 190.000 - www.limerickcoco.ie

    www.rooneys.eu/map.aspx --- freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mc...

    Limerick (Luimneach en irlandés) es un condado en la provincia de Munster, al oeste de Irlanda. Limita con el Condado de Clare por el norte, con el Condado de Cork por el sur y con el Condado de Kerry por el oeste. El Río Shannon atraviesa la ciudad de Limerick y desemboca en el Océano Atlántico. Below the city, the waterway is known as the Shannon Estuary. Because the estuary is shallow, the county's most important port is several kilometres west of Limerick city, at Foynes.
    Capital Limerick Otra ciudad importante del condado es Newcastle West que es la segunda luego de la capital.
    Other towns mainly lie along the Limerick – Tralee roads (N21) and Limerick – Cork road (N20).
    History-History of Limerick
    Geography
    County Limerick is the green heartland of Munster and one possible explanation of its Irish name Luimneach (the flat area) certainly makes sense when compared with the rest of the province. Especially in the east, the land consist mostly of a fertile limestone plain, which is ringed by mountains on its borders; The Slieve Felims, The Galtees (Na Gaibhlte) and the Ballyhoura Mountains. The highest point in County Limerick is Galtymore (919m), on the border with County Tipperary in the far south-east corner of the county. However it would be wrong to say that the county is a monotonous plain, for the county is dotted with hills and ridges. This eastern part of the county is the heartland of the Golden Vale, the rich, verdant fields famous for their dairy produce. Towards the west, the aptly named Mullaghareirk Mountains ("Mullach na Radhairc" in Irish, roughly meaning mountains of the view) push across the county offering dramatic views east over the county and west into County Kerry.
    Volcanic rock is to be found in numerous areas in the county, at Carrigogunnell, at Knockfierna, and principally at Pallasgreen/Kilteely in the east, which has been described as the most compact and for its size one of the most varied and complete carboniferous volcanic districts in either Britain and Ireland.
    County Limerick is drained principally by the Rivers Mulkear, Loobagh, Maigue, Deel and the Feale, which are all, ultimately, tributaries of the River Shannon. The Shannon Estuary forms the northern boundary of the county, giving Limerick a navigable outlet to the sea, the principal ports being Limerick and Foynes
    See also : Geography of Ireland

    Transportation--------------
    Rail
    Limerick has three operational railway lines passing through it,-the Ballybrophy line leading to North Tipperary through Nenagh and Roscrea
    -the Ennis line through County Clare (only that station is currently operation)
    -the Limerick Junction line which is the busiest line, connecting Limerick to the Cork-Dublin line.
    In addition, a line exists to Foynes but the last revenue service was in 2000.
    Bus
    The county's regional/national bus hub is located beside Limerick City train station.
    Air
    No commercial airports are situated in County Limerick and the region's needs are serviced from Shannon Airport in County Clare, although some in the south of the county may also use Kerry Airport and Cork Airport is also within 1 hour's drive.
    Tourist attractions in County Limerick
    Adare - Adare Manor - Castle Oliver - Clare Glens - Curraghchase Forest Park
    Foynes - Glin-Estuary Drive - Glenstal Abbey - King John's Castle - Lough Gur

    See Limerick for tourist attractions in Limerick city.
    Towns and villages
    Abbeyfeale - Adare - Annacotty - Ardpatrick - Askeaton - Athea - Athlacca - Ballingarry
    Ballylanders - Broadford -Bruff - Cappamore - Castleconnell - Castlemahon - Castletown - Clarina - Crecora - Croagh - Croom - Dromcolliher - Doon - Feenagh - Feohanagh - Foynes - Galbally - Garryspillane - Herbertstown - Hospital - Kilbehenny
    Kilfinane - Kilmallock - Kilteely-Dromkeen - Knockaderry - Limerick - Mountcollins -Murroe - Newcastle West - Oola - Pallasgreen - Pallaskenry - Patrickswell - Raheen
    Rathkeale - Shanagolden - Templeglantine - Tournafulla
    See also
    Teskey
    List of abbeys and priories in the Republic of Ireland (County Limerick)
    External links
    Limerick's Official Tourist Website
    Limerick County Council
    Map of Limerick
    Limerick GAA Website
    Worthies of Thomond by Robert Herbert- biographical profiles of notable Limerick & Clare people
    Ferrar's History of Limerick
    THE SÉAMUS Ó CEALLAIGH COLLECTION - Limerick sports history and Gaelic Games
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    Capital: Limerick
    Limerick.com Street Map of Limerick City
    Accommodation in Limerick-Map of Limerick-Accommodation Guide
    Limerick Map - Road detailed map of Limerick -
    WGS-84 (GPS) Coordenadas: 52.6652° N 8.6238° O
    www.foundmark.com/.../pages/Lk-stats.html
    Read more about Limerick:
    The City, Do & See, Cafés, Eating, Bars & Nightlife, Shopping, Sleeping, Essential Information
    Limerick (en idioma irlandés: Luimneach) es una ciudad capital del Condado de Limerick en la provincia de Munster, en el oeste de la República de Irlanda.
    Geografía
    La ciudad se encuentra a orillas del río Shannon, que se puede cruzar en tres puntos cercanos al centro de la ciudad. Aunque la población de la ciudad es de 54.023 habitantes (2002), contando su área metropolitana alcanzaría los 86.998 (2002). Su área es de 20,79 km²
    Sus visitantes se mantienen siempre ocupados visitando King John´s Castle, St. Mary´s Cathedral, Hunt Museum, haciendo visitas a pié por la ciudad y paseos en barca a lo largo del Shannon.
    Economy - Transport - Architecture - Education -
    Historia de Limerick
    La ciudad data desde al menos la colonización de los vikingos en el año 812; aunque algunos estudios sugieren la presencia de poblaciones anteriores en la zona. Los normandos rediseñaron la ciudad en el siglo XII y añadieron parte de los edificios más notables de la población, como por ejemplo, el Castillo del Rey Juan (St. John's Castle en inglés) o la Catedral de Santa María. Durante las guerras civiles del siglo XVII, la ciudad desempeñó un papel crucial, siendo sitiada por Oliver Cromwell en 1651 y dos veces por los Guillermistas en los años 1690. Al final del segundo de estos sitios se firmó el Tratado de Limerick (1691).
    Limerick se enriqueció del mercado a finales del siglo XVIII, pero el Acta de Unión en 1800 y la hambruna causó una depresión económica de la que el país solo logró superar en los tiempos del Tigre Celta en los años 1990. La línea ferroviaria a Waterford unió a la ciudad a la principal entre Cork y Dublín en 1848 y a Waterford en 1853. La apertura de cierto número de líneas secundarias, convirtió a la ciudad en un centro de comunicaciones a nivel regional.

    Vista del Río Shannon, con el barrio medieval al fondo
    Arte
    La ciudad ha servido como escenario al libro de Frank McCourt: Las cenizas de Ángela y para la película del mismo nombre.
    Turismo
    La ciudad de Limerick es una de los destinos turísticos favoritos dentro de la isla. La ciudad está a sólo 15 minutos en coche del Aeropuerto del Shannon. Actualmente el turismo se está incrementando a un ritmo espectacular tal que en 2006 se abrieron 5 nuevos hoteles proporcionando 1.000 camas más para los turistas.
    Las mayores atracciones turísticas de la ciudad incluyen el Castillo del Rey Juan (1212), La Catedral de St. Mary (1168), la Piedra del Tratado (Treaty Stone) o el Museo Hunt. Existen además distintos itinerarios turísticos por diversas partes de la ciudad, así como visitando los principales lugares citados en las obras de Frank McCourt. El pueblo de Adare se encuentra en los alrededores de la ciudad y es una atracción turística bastante popular por sus construcciones tradicionales.
    Crime
    Media articles often refer to Limerick as "Stab City", a term which originated in the press in the 1980s, but this is not supported by the facts or by official statistics. Specifically, in the last year Dublin has had 10 fatal stabbings (Limerick had 1, Cork had 2 in the same period). Knife crime is actually now perceived as a major problem throughout the entire country.
    A March 11th 2008 article in The Irish Times suggested that violent crime rates in Limerick are higher than elsewhere in the country.
    Recent years have seen serious crimes in Limerick being linked with feuds between criminal gangs within certain areas of the city, mainly Moyross, Southill and St. Mary's Park. Arguably, this rivalry was precipitated by the murder of alleged gang member Eddie Ryan in November 2000, in a public house in the Johnsgate area of the city.
    Despite a relative lull in gang violence between 2004 and the first half of 2006 in Limerick's housing estates, the problem seems to have escalated again in September 2006, with two children suffering extensive burns in the torching of their mother's car in early September, and a series of apparently retaliatory attacks including a drive-by shooting later that month.
    Recently the government appointed Mr. John Fitzgerald (retired Dublin City Manager) to carry out a speedy and comprehensive investigation of issues prevailing in Moyross and other parts of Limerick City and to make recommendations directly to the Government's Cabinet Committee on Social Inclusion. Mr. Fitzgerald reported back in early April 2007 and his recommendations were fully endorsed and approved by the Cabinet. A key element of the approved recommendations was the creation of two new special purpose Government Agencies for the Southside and Northside of Limerick City and these Agencies were established by Government Order dated 15th June 2007.
    Enlaces externos
    Wikimedia Commons / Limerick
    Limerick-City.com
    Limerick City Council
    Limerick.com
    Colegio Limerick
    www.limerickcoco.ie
    Cursos de inglés en Limerick, Escuelas de inglés en Limerick ...
    Castillo del Rey Juan (Limerick) - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
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    Limerick
    Disfrute de un condado lleno de paisajes maravillosos y de sorpresas
    Descubra un condado espectacular, rico en herencia cultural y algunas de las localidades más bellas de Irlanda.
    Limerick es una verdadera joya, que se extiende a lo largo de la gloriosa región del Shannon. En cada esquina hay algo diferente, un pueblecito encantador, un castillo excéntrico, una maravilla arqueológica o una vista espectacular.
    La sobrecogedora belleza de las Montañas Ballyhoura preside sobre una campiña tranquila y salpicada de lugares históricos y monumentos evocadores.
    Los pueblecitos y ciudades de Limerick son famosos por su belleza, y hay lugares como Castleconnell, Killmallock y Adare llenos de una magia y romanticismo muy especiales. Quedará seducido al instante.

    County Limerick - Adare - Thatched Roof Cottage

    Tom Stade - Duke Special - Fitzgeralds Woodlands Hotel - Overnight Spa Escape - Shannon Region Tourist Authority - Adare Village - Visión general - Destacamos - Datos - Alojamiento - Mapa - Sobre Irlanda - Dónde Ir - Qué ver y qué hacer - Planficar visita - Alojamiento - Ofertas
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    ¿Lo sabía?
    El café irlandés se hizo por primera vez en Foynes, Condado de Limerick, centro de aviación en ese momento. El inventor, Joe Sheridan, ¡lo ideó para animar y calentar un poco a los congelados
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    Limerick is a medieval city, standing where the River Shannon becomes tidal.
    As an historic place it has many interesting features as well as being an important port and industrial centre.
    County Limerick is a place of quiet beauty and rural charm, offering good sport to the angler and golfer and some of the finest hunting country in Ireland.
    Much of County Limerick is low and undulating-particularly in the east, where it forms part of the rich plain known as the Golden Vale. There are, however, considerable elevations towards the west, south and north-east fringes of the county, and in the south-east the Galtee mountains reach into County Limerick from neighbouring County Tipperary.
    Many 12th century churches can be found throughout Limerick and The Hunt Museum houses a fine collection of Irish and European religious art. Recently moved, the Hunt Museum in the Old Customs House is one of the finest collections of antiquities in Europe. The Augustinian Friory has a true medieval feel, while the 13th-century Trinitarian Abbey is the only house of the order in Ireland. Both are still in use, the former by the Church of Ireland, the latter by the Catholic Church.
    Adare Village a few miles from Limerick City is billed as the prettiest village in Ireland. Restored in the 1820's by the Earl of Dunraven the long narrow Village Street is a picture of neat stonework and thatch roofs. The county spreads out around the mouth of the Shannon, Ireland's longest river, and its main focus Limerick City is built on the river, where it meets the Atlantic Ocean. Ireland's third largest city, Limerick, is home to a grid of gracious Georgian terraces and earlier medieval town plans.
    Co. Limerick has a whole range of visitor attractions that are well worth exploring. Attractions include the Adare Heritage Centre on Adare's pretty main street; Croom Mills Waterwheel and Heritage Centre, the Foynes Flying Boat Museum - once the centre of the aviation world where Irish coffee was invented; Celtic Park and Gardens; Curraghchase Forest Park and Lough Gur, habitat of Neolithic Man and one of Ireland's most important archaeological sites.
    Main Tourist Attractions
    · Croom Mills and Heritage Centre - Limerick
    This uniquely restored nineteenth century granary shows working conditions for millers and blacksmiths in dramatic settings. It is complimented by an audio-visual film on the history of grain milling locally. The mill race flows gently beneath the superb restaurant and craft shop
    · Curraghmore Forest Park - Kilcornan
    Located at Kilcornan, Curraghchase Forest Park is a six hundred acre plantation of exceptional beauty. It features walkways, a lake and garden, a nature trail and the ruins of the eighteenth century home of the poet Aubrey de Vere.
    · Foynes Museum - Limerick
    The Foynes museum recalls the era with a comprehensive range of exhibits and graphic illustrations. It also includes a 1940s style cinema, the original terminal building through which many VIPs passed, war years' radio and the weather room. Irish coffee was "invented" here in 1943. During the 1930s and early 1940s, the port of Foynes was the fulcrum point for air traffic between the United States and Europe. The famous flying boats were frequent visitors, carrying passengers who ranged from celebrities to refugees.
    · Lough Gur Stone Age Centre - Ballyneety
    Located at Ballyneety, the Lough Gur Centre is the most important Stone Age site in Ireland. The visitor centre, on its lakeside site, contains a display and audio-visual show presenting the site's history. The archaeology of the area provides evidence of the activities of the first farmers in the region, their dwellings, ritual and burial sites, as well as their tools and implements. The story stretches over 5,000 years and continues to the present day.
    · The Bishops Palace - Limerick
    The Bishops' Palace is located at Church Street, adjacent to King John's Castle and is the restored home of former Protestant Bishops of Limerick. The Palace has a classical facade and is related to the English Palladian style.
    · The Hunt Musem - Limerick
    Located at The Custom House, Rutland Street, Limerick City, the Hunt Museum is home to one of Ireland's greatest private collections of art and antiquities. Generously donated to the 'people of Ireland' by John and Gertrude Hunt who collected pieces from the four corners of the world. The Collection reflects our Celtic past as well as masterworks by Da Vinci, Yeats and Renoir.
    Heritage Sites
    · Banqueting Hall (Desmond Hall) - Newcastlewest
    West Limerick preserves many of Ireland's surviving spacious medieval halls. The desmond banqueting hall is an imposing two-storey structure and was used by the Earls of Desmond for banqueting and entertainment. The Hall, vaulted lower chamber and adjoining tower were all constructed during the 15th century (the hall and chamber were built on the remains of a 13th century structure of similar size).
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    En la ciudad más antigua de Irlanda podrás encontrar edificios medievales, exuberantes y verdes praderas, magníficos castillos y una extraordinaria vida nocturna.
    Limerick está situado en el río Shannon cerca de la pintoresca costa de Irlanda. Es la tercera ciudad más grande de Irlanda con 90.000 habitantes. Se caracteriza por poseer edificios históricos y un romántico castillo. Limerick es una ciudad de estudiantes con mucha vida y muy hospitalaria con varios pubs, bares y restaurantes. Hay varios museos y galerías de arte que muestran tanto arte irlandés como internacional. Limerick está situada en el corazón de la verde Irlanda y es ideal para hacer excursiones. Su capital, Dublín y Cork están a una distancia bastante cercana.
    Actividades de ocio y tiempo libre
    En la parte antigua de la ciudad de Limerick, conocida como la ciudad irlandesa, se encuentran la mayoría de los edificios antiguos de la ciudad. La mayoría de las casas fueron edificadas en el siglo XVIII.
    En el Hunt Museum, un viejo almacén del siglo XIX, han sido expuestas más de 2.000 obras de arte de conocidos artistas de los siglos XIX y XX. Por ejemplo, esculturas de Picaso o de Leonardo da Vinci. Hay más exposiciones contempóraneas, que se muestran en la galería de arte de Limerick.
    Limerick dispone de una animada escena musical. Muchas salas de conciertos y pequeños pubs ofrecen a numerosos grupos irlandeses la oportunidad de tocar en directo.
    El fin de semana se ofrece una excursión a la trepidante capital de la Isla, Dublín.También se llega rápido a Cork, la segunda ciudad más grande de Irlanda.
    Te recomendamos que reserves tu vuelo a Shannon o Dublín. Hay un servicio de autobuses desde el aeropuerto de Dublín hasta Limerick (precio aproximdo 20 €—45 € Duración: 5 horas). Para conseguir información adicional puedes visitar la web www.buseireann.ie. El primer autobús de Dublín a Limerick sale a las 7:30 de la mañana y el último a las 20:00. El primer autobús de Limerick a Dublín sale a las 7:30 (y llega al aeropuerto de Dublín a las 11:10), el último sale a las 19:30 (llega al aeropuerto de Dublín a las 23:10). El servicio de transfer desde el aeropuerto de Shannon (solo ida) o la estación de tren o autobuses de Limerick hasta el alojamiento está incluido en el precio del curso.
    1.Limerick - Inglés - Cursos de idiomas para adultos - Inglés - LISA ...
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    Limerick, el paseo más animado de Irlanda
    Limerick es conocida internacionalmente por ser el lugar donde pasó la infancia el escritor Frank McCourt, nacido en Nueva York y autor del best-seller Las cenizas de Ángela. Hoy en día se puede decir que, a pesar de que no le hace falta situaciones externas para atraer turistas, gracias a la novela han venido hasta aquí numerosísimas personas.
    La ciudad de Limerick tiene unos 91.000 habitantes y se encuentra en la zona más meridional del país. Vale la pena viajar hasta allí al menos un día, si no una estancia de un fin de semana. El centro de la ciudad se divide en tres secciones, conocidas como English Town, Irish Town y Newton Pery.
    - English Town es donde se concentra la mayoría de los lugares turísticos de la ciudad.
    - En Irish Town podemos encontrarnos con la gran belleza de sus calles.
    - Y en Newton Pery nos quedaremos con la arquitectura georgiana.
    Podemos comenzar nuestra visita en el Castillo del Rey Juan, una estructura fortificada del siglo X, justo cuando los vikingos comenzaron a llegar a la zona. De allí tenemos una fabulosa vista de la Catedral de Santa María, una catedral anglicana del siglo XII. Pero Limerick también tiene otra catedral, la de San Juan, catedral católica mucho más reciente. Construida en el siglo XIX, tiene la aguja más alta de Irlanda.
    La ciudad también cuenta con el Museo Hunt, donde se expone la colección de la familia Hunt. Algunas de las piezas que se exponen son de la Edad de Piedra e incluso otras pertenecen al antiguo Egipto.
    Otra de las grandes opciones que tenemos en Limerick es un paseo en barco, o bien un tour sobre los lugares más significativos del autor Frank McCourt. Nos acercamos ahora al Milk Market, construido a principios de 1800, un mercado interior que se puede visitar sobre todo los sábados. Durante el resto de la semana están abiertos los puestos que no venden productos de alimentación.
    El Newton Pery es la zona del centro, y es donde podemos contemplar la arquitectura típicamente georgiana, edificios construidos en el siglo XIX.
    Por otra parte, la vida nocturna aquí es muy activa, y ofrece un montón de lugares para pasar la noche. Desde los tradicionales pubs irlandeses a los bares más modernos. Además, teniendo en cuenta que Limerick es una ciudad universitaria, podéis estar seguro de que la noche y el ambiente suele estar muy animado.
    (Por: Jose Manuel Vargas) (sobreirlanda.com)
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  7. #1667
    Usuario Avatar de Nettus
    Fecha de ingreso
    01 feb, 08
    Ubicación
    Lundby
    Mensajes
    4,725

    Predeterminado Tipperary

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    19. Condado: Tipperary
    Capital: norte: Nenagh - sur: Clonmel
    Province: Munster - Area: 4,303 km2 - Population: ~ 155.000
    County Tipperary (Irish: Contae Thiobraid Árann) is a county in Ireland situated in the province of Munster. Tipperary was one of the first Irish counties to be established in the 13th century. For all government administration purposes the county is divided into North Tipperary (county town: Nenagh) and South Tipperary (county town: Clonmel). This division dates back to the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898, the county's two "ridings" having had separate assize courts for much longer. The use of riding for the divisions was a historical misnomer, since the word derives from the dividing of an area into three parts. Indeed the expression riding has been discontinued for official purposes since 2002 (Local Government Act, 2001 section 10 and schedule 5)
    Tipperary is sometimes referred to as the Premier County, a description attributed to Thomas Davis, Editor of The Nation newspaper in the 1840s as a tribute to the nationalistic feeling in Tipperary and said that "where Tipperary leads, Ireland follows". Tipperary is famous for its horse breeding industry and is the home of Coolmore Stud, which is the largest thoroughbred breeding operation in the world. The County forms a large part of the Golden Vale (or Vein) of Munster, boasting a rich and fertile agricultural landscape. The County particularly nurtures the ancient game of hurling and its teams have regularly been champions of Ireland since the 19th century.
    The town of Tipperary situated in the south west of the county was the subject of the famous World War IBritish army song It's a Long Way to Tipperary. As with several other counties in Ireland named for a town or village (examples include Leitrim and Mayo) Tipperary Town has never been the county town of County Tipperary. That honour belonged to Cashel for a while prior to the creation of the County Palatine and thereafter to Clonmel until the creation of separate assizes in 1838 when Clonmel has shared the honour with Nenagh
    Towns and villages
    Ballina - Bansha - Borrisokane - Borrisoleigh - Cahir - Carrick-on-Suir - Cashel -
    Castleiney - Clonmel - Cloughjordan - Dundrum - Emly - Fethard - Golden - Hollyford
    Holycross - Horse and Jockey - Killenaule - Kilmoyler - Knockgraffon - Lisronagh
    Littleton - Loughmore - Milestone - Nenagh - New Inn - Newport - Rearcross - Roscrea
    Rosegreen - Templemore - Thurles - Tipperary Town - Toomevara - Two-Mile Borris
    Upperchurch
    Townlands
    Boytonrath - Garranlea - Lagganstown
    Knockshegowna (Ballingarry) - Cnoc Shí Gubhna Baile an Gharraí
    Places of interest
    Athassel Priory - Cahir Castle - Dromineer
    Galtymore - the highest mountain in County Tipperary (919m).
    Glen of Aherlow - Holy Cross Abbey - Lough Derg - Ormonde Castle
    Redwood Castle (Castle Egan)
    Rock of Cashel
    Slievenamon - Sliabh na mBan - mountain associated with many Irish legends (721m).
    See also
    Irish Vehicle Registration Plates
    List of abbeys and priories in the Republic of Ireland (County Tipperary)
    North Tipperary
    South Tipperary
    Tipperary Hill, a neighbourhood in Syracuse, New York, United States, inhabited by many descendants of County Tipperary.
    External links
    Tipperary Institute
    County Tipperary Historical Society
    A website dedicated to the genealogical records of the county. It offers fragments of the 1766 census, the complete Down Survey, as well as a ream of other useful information
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    Nenagh (An tAonach in Irish) is the county town of North Tipperary, Ireland. It is the administrative capital of North Tipperary. It has a population in 2006 of 7,415.
    Nenagh was originally a market town, and its name in Irish, An tAonach means "The Fair", a reference to Aonach Urmhumhan, the Ormond (East Munster) Fair, of which it was the site. Nenagh is today a busy commercial town and is governed by Nenagh Town Council. The town's historic attractions include Nenagh Castle, the Heritage Centre, and the ruined Franciscanabbey.
    Geography
    Nenagh lies to the west of the Nenagh River, which empties into Lough Derg at Dromineer, 9 km to the north-west, a popular centre for sailing and other water sports. The Silvermines mountains lie to the south of the town, with the highest peak being Keeper Hill (Sliabh Ciamalta in Irish) at 694m. The Silvermines Mountains have witnessed mining for silver and base metals on and off over seven hundred years. Traces of 19th century mine workings remain.

    Road
    Nenagh is situated on the R445Regional Road, which links it to the N7National Primary Route (which bypasses the town to the south) between Limerick and Dublin, as well as the N52National Secondary Route to Birr (and through the Midlands to Dundalk).
    Rail
    Nenagh has a station on the railway line between Limerick and Ballybrophy. Passengers can connect at Ballybrophy to trains heading northeast to Dublin or southwest to Cork or Tralee. Nenagh railway station opened on 5 October 1863.
    The railway line is lightly used. Lack of upkeep means that the line is restricted to a maximum speed of 40 km/h and the existing trains are poorly timetabled for commuters. A committee (the Nenagh Rail Steering Committee) working in conjunction with Irish Railway News, had a meeting with the national railway company Iarnród Éireann (IÉ) on 1 September 2005 to present the results of a traffic study funded by Nenagh Town Council and North Tipperary County Council, and to seek a morning and evening service between Nenagh and Limerick which would increase commuter traffic. IÉ agreed to delay an afternoon service from the December 2005 timetable and to work towards an early service when equipment permitted from 2007.
    While the twice-a-day service on the Ballybrophy/Limerick line is poor, Nenagh is only 37 km from Thurles, which is on the main Dublin/Cork line, and which has around 18 trains daily in each direction, including non-stop services to and from Dublin.
    See also
    Nenagh Guardian
    Nenagh railway station
    Ardcrony
    List of towns and villages in Ireland
    Market Houses in Ireland
    External links
    Nenagh - The Friendly Town
    Nenagh Community Bulletin Board
    Nenagh Town Council
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    Capital: -sur: Clonmel
    Interactive Map of Clonmel, County Tipperary, Ireland
    WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 52°21′14″N 7°42′42″W / 52.3539, -7.7116

    Clonmel (Cluain Meala en irlandés) es una localidad de la República de Irlanda situada en el Condado de Tipperary. Se encuentra en medio de un valle, rodeada de montañas y colinas. Tiene al sur las montañas de Comeragh y al este la población de Slievenamon. El río Suir atraviesa la localidad.
    Clonmel fue construida en la Edad Media y conserva muchos elementos que recuerdan su pasado, tales como parte de la muralla que la rodeaba. Oliver Cromwell sitió la ciudad en 1650.
    Clonmel ha sido siempre un centro importante de comercio. El río era navegable hasta Clomel hacia 1760 y la finalización de los trabajos en el Suir durante el siglo XIX permitió qué barcos de mayor tamaño alcanzaran los muelles de la localidad.

    Culture: Museums - Art galleries - TheatreMusic - Coursing - Events
    Transport
    The river had been made navigable to Clonmel from 1760 when completion of the River Suir Navigation in the 19th century allowed large vessels to reach the town's quays. Charles Bianconi, onetime mayor of Clonmel, ran his pioneering public transport system of horse-drawn carriages from Clonmel. Clonmel railway station opened 1 May1852. Today, there are four trains daily to Waterford and four to Limerick Junction which has main-line connections to Dublin.
    Clonmel is located on the N24, the national primary roadway that links the cities of Limerick and Waterford.
    Commerce
    In recent times Clonmel has become the home to many large multi-national companies, particularly in the medical area. The two biggest medical companies in the town are Abbott and Boston Scientific, both of which manufacture implantable devices. Bulmerscider, also known as Magners outside of Ireland, is brewed in a complex three kilometres east of the town, and the extensive orchards serving the brewery can be seen from the road when approaching Clonmel from that direction.
    See also
    List of towns in the Republic of Ireland
    Market Houses in the Republic of Ireland
    Siege of Clonmel
    External links
    Tipperary Institute
    Clonmel.ie, Clonmel town's official Website
    clonmel.ie, Página oficial de Clonmel
    visitclonmel.com: Clonmel Negocios, Turismo y Noticias
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    Tipperary, Ireland's largest inland county, has richly varied scenery in its hills and mountains, its plains and river valleys.
    In the south are the Galtee Mountains, the Knockmealdowns and the isolated height of Slievenamon.
    The middle of the county is a broad plain, through which the River Suir flows from north to south; and from this plain the rich land of the Golden Vale extends westwards into County Limerick.
    Apart from its scenery and Tipperary has excellent facilities for pastimes such as angling, golf, mountain climbing, caving and hunting.
    Tipperary is Ireland's best-recognized county, popularized in the World War One song 'Its a long long way to Tipperary'. Tipperary has a long and fabled history, and when traveling there, must-see's are the fabulous ruins at the Rock of Cashel, once a seat of the kings of Munster, is the most notable landmark. Approached from the north or west, The Rock of Cashel appears as a mirage of crenellations rising bolt upright from the vast encircling plain.
    The rock, less than a quarter of a mile wide, is arguably the most extraordinary architectural site in Ireland and is also the place where St Patrick is supposed to have picked a shamrock in order to explain the doctrine of the Trinity.
    Tipperary has beautiful lush mountain scenery and the most famous of these hills is known as the Devil's Bit, named for the bite taken out of it by the devil as he rode over Ireland, and the hunk he spat out is now the Rock of Cashel! The mighty River Shannon, Ireland's longest, flows through Tipperary, and Lough Derg, shown here is the biggest of its 3 lakes.
    Tipperary's countryside is rich in contrast. The Silvermines and Devil's Bit mountains provide spectacular drives and stimulating walks. The river Suir is noted for its brown trout and is accessible at many points.
    Tipperary attractions include Holy Cross Abbey - one of Europe's most significant early monastic sites; Nenagh and Roscrea heritage centres and "Lar na Pairce", Thurles, an interpretative centre that tells of the history of Gaelic Games. Activities include River Shannon cruising (including day cruises), sailing, angling, watersports, golf, horse riding and bird watching.
    Main Tourist Attractions
    · Carrick On Suir Heritage Centre - Carrick-On-Suir
    This former Protestant church, now restored as a heritage centre, was once part of the Pre-Reformation burial ground and church site of Carrick Mor. Its interesting gravestones include a memorial to Thomas Butler, an illegitimate son of Thomas, tenth Earl of Ormonde. Dorothea Herbert, daughter of the eighteenth century rector and author of 'Retrospections' is also buried here.

    · Cashel Folk Village - Cashel
    Located at Dominick Street, Cashel, it has a delightful series of informal reconstructions of various traditional thatched village shops, a forge and other business. It is housed within the town of Cashel, near by the famed Rock of Cashel.
    · Mitchelstown Cave - Cahir
    Located at Burncourt, Cahir, is considered one of the most spectacular caves in Europe. The caves have three massive caverns, in which the visitor is surrounded by indescribable drip stone formations, stalactites, stalagmites and huge calcite columns.
    · The Bru Boru Centre - Cashel
    Located beside the Rock of Cashel, it has a folk theatre, restaurant, craft and information centre and a genealogy suite. Traditional Irish music, song and dance are provided for visitors by the world famous resident Bru Boru group of Irish musicians and artists during the Summer season.
    · The Dundrum Plantarum - Dundrum
    It has eight acres of trees, shrubs and a two mile walk. There are sixty thousand plants and over two thousand varieties. A Celtic theme runs through the Plantarum with crannogs, dolmens and fairy forts all on view. There are also many interesting water features including lakes and waterfalls.
    Heritage Sites
    · Cahir Castle - Cahir
    Located at Castle Street, Cahir, is one of Ireland's largest and best preserved castles. It is situated on a rocky island in the river Suir. The Castle's attractions include an excellent audio-visual show called 'Partly Hidden and Partly Revealed' in English, French, German and Italian, informing visitors about all the main sites of the area.
    · Ormond Castle - Carrick -
    www.discoverireland.ie/Result/IndividualResul...
    Located at Castle Park, Carrick on Suir, is one of the finest examples of an Elizabethan manor house in Ireland. It was built by Thomas, the tenth Earl of Ormond in the 1560s. Closely integrated into the manor house are two fifteenth century towers. It is the country's only major unfortified dwelling from that turbulent period. The state rooms contain some of the finest decorative plasterwork in the country, including plasterwork portraits. Access to the castle is by guided tour only, with a maximum number of twenty people at one time.
    · Roscrea Heritage (Castle and Damer House) - Roscrea
    The stone castle consists of a gate tower, curtain walls and two corner towers dating from the 1280s. The castle rooms are furnished and some house exhibitions. Built in the early 18th century in the Queen Anne style, Damer House is an example of pre-Palladian architecture. Its rooms house temporary exhibitions.
    · Swiss Cottage - Cahir
    Located close to Cahir Town, the Swiss Cottage is a delightful 'cottage ornee' built in the early 1800s on the estate of the Earls of Glengall. It is situated on an elevated site with access by stone steps.
    · The Rock of Cashel - Cashel
    A spectacular group of medieval buildings on an outcrop of limestone. Set in the Golden Vale, the group includes a round tower, Romanesque chapel, cathedral and restored hall of the Vicars Choral. On site there's an audio visual show entitled, Strongholds of Faith.

    www.rayjeanne.com/IR2007Page.htm
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    ¿Lo sabía?
    Las Islas Blasket están en el mismo borde de Europa y estuvieron habitadas hasta 1953, cuando la persistente emigración de su población más joven las dejó con tan sólo 22
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    Sur
    La pintoresca costa irlandesa del sur se balancea a su propio ritmo. Tranquila, bonita y llena de atracciones naturales, este será tu principal destino si lo que quieres son paisajes impresionantes o probar algún producto recientemente elaborado en una granja local.
    La pintoresca costa irlandesa del sur se balancea a su propio ritmo. Tranquila, bonita y llena de atracciones naturales, este será tu principal destino si lo que quieres es probar algún producto recientemente elaborado en una granja local, en algún restaurante gourmet o en un Mercado de Productos Agrícolas, que puedes escoger entre los muchos que verás por los coloridos pueblos o ciudades.

    El sur está dividido entre los condados de Carlow, Cork, Kerry, Kilkenny, Tipperary, Waterford y Wexford y tiene gran encanto en todos los sentidos, ya sea en sus encalados pubs disfrutando de una buena sopa de marisco, practicar ala delta en su mágico entorno, o conocer los espectaculares anillos de Beara y de Kerry.
    Si lo que quieres es mimarte en un balneario de lujo, Kerry es el lugar ideal, Cork tiene una gran cantidad de restaurantes muy famosos y a lo largo del “Soleado Sureste”, los bonitos pueblos pesqueros de Wexford y Waterford son una encantadora oferta si lo que te apetece es desconectar, y dejar que se te pierda la vista en sus playas de arena interminables.
    Kilkenny, Carlow y Tipperary tienen también mucha historia que contar, restos arqueológicos, monumentos y antiguos rincones de arte pagano para que explores a tu aire. Y todo esto envuelto en la belleza y tranquilidad de estos condados de aguas brillantes y naturaleza virgen.
    Nunca ha sido tan fácil llegar al sur de Irlanda con vuelos directos desde muchas ciudades españoles y estarás encantado con la gran cantidad de cosas que ver y hacer ne esta zona.
    Rothe House Christmas Miscellany
    New Ross Nollaig Festival
    CLARION HOTEL - Weekend 2 nights B and B + 1 dinner
    Visión general - Destacamos - Datos - Alojamiento - Mapa
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    Did you know?
    Ronald Reagan is actually a pub as well as a US president. The bar in Ballyporeen celebrates the president’s visit to the town when he enjoyed a pint in the place, which was later named after him
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    Tipperary
    Grande, exuberante y variado. Disfrute de multitud de actividades en el condado más grande del interior de Irlanda
    Tipperary es el condado más grande del interior de Irlanda, y debido a su tamaño, normalmente se divide en Tipperary del sur, en la región del sureste, y Tipperary del norte, en la región del Shannon.
    Grande, rico y variado, el condado ofrece excelentes vistas y paisajes, ya que Tipperary del norte queda delimitado por el deslumbrante Lago Derg, y Tipperary del sur disfruta de exuberantes valles y paisajes realzados por las preciosas Montañas Galtee y el místico Slievenamon.
    Con un sinfín de atracciones históricas, que incluyen la Roca de Cashel, el Castillo de Roscrea, y la Abadía Holycross, además de montones de pequeños pueblos pintorescos y bonitas ciudades, como Dromineer, Garrykennedy, Cahir y Terryglass, Tipperary es un condado que le encantará descubrir.


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  8. #1668
    Usuario Avatar de Nettus
    Fecha de ingreso
    01 feb, 08
    Ubicación
    Lundby
    Mensajes
    4,725

    Predeterminado Clare

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    20. Condado: Clare - Capital: Ennis
    Provincia: Munster - Superficie: 3.174 km² - Población: ~ 110.000 - www.clare.ie

    www.spirited-ireland.net/map/clare/
    1 - Killimer - Tarbert - 2 - Quilty - 3 - Spanish Point - 4 - Miltown Malbay -
    5 - Cliffs of Moher - 6 - Burren - 7 - Bealaclugga
    Special Edition County Clare

    El condado de Clare (An Clár en irlandés) se encuentra en la provincia de Munster, en la República de Irlanda. Está situado en la costa occidental de la isla, frente al Océano Atlántico, al noroeste del río Shannon.
    Sitios de Interés: Acantilados de Moher (Una hilera de acantilados de los más altos de Europa) The Burren. (Zona al oeste del condado que contiene restos paleolíticos)

    Cliffs of Moher Guided Tours

    Clare is one of the 26 counties within the Republic of Ireland and it provides a basis for local government, in the form of its own constituency within the Dáil Éireann. The county system has existed since the 16th century; as well as its governmental usage, the counties form a significant part of local identity and culture within the country. Located on the west coast of Ireland, Clare is northwest of the River Shannon.
    The most populated town and county seat is Ennis.
    County Clare succeeded the district of Thomond (which was part of Connacht), and when first created it was sometimes called County Thomond. Its nickname is the Banner County, which may refer to a former local tradition of carrying banners at political meetings and public occasions.
    Geography
    Physical and geological
    See also: Geology of Ireland Bodies of water define much of the physical boundaries of Clare. To the southeast is the River Shannon which is Ireland's longest river, the border to the northeast is defined by Lough Derg which is the third largest lake on Ireland and to the west is the Atlantic Ocean. The only county which is physically connected to Clare by land is County Galway to the north, however there are several across-water bridges which connects it to eastwards County Tipperary and southwards County Limerick. Along with County Cork, County Kerry, County Waterford, County Limerick and County Tipperary, County Clare is part of Munster which is one of the four traditional provinces of Ireland.
    County Clare contains The Burren, a unique karst region, which contains rare flowers and fauna. At the western edge of The Burren, facing the Atlantic Ocean, are the Cliffs of Moher.
    The highest point in County Clare is Moylussa, 532m, in the Slieve Bearnagh range in the east of the county.
    The county's Southern border is the River Shannon, the longest river in Ireland. Along this estuary is the town of Shannon and the location of Shannon International Airport. This airport was the first airport to have a duty-free zone.

    www.touristr.com/flag/search_results?search=k...
    Kilrush was once a major port. There's still a marina here, lots of pubs and you can take a boat to see the dolphins on the Shannon Estuary.
    Main towns
    Ennis - Shannon - Kilrush
    Other small towns and villages
    Ballynacally, Ballyvaughan - Carrigaholt - Carron - Clarecastle - Cooraclare - Corofin - Cratloe - Cree (Creegh) - Doolin - Doonbeg - Doora - Ennistymon - Feakle - Inagh - Inch - Kilbaha - Kilfenora - Kilkee - Killadysert - Killaloe - KilmihilKilnamona - Lahinch - Liscannor - Lisdoonvarna - Lissycasey - Meelick - Miltown Malbay - Mountshannon - Mullagh - Newmarket-on-Fergus - O'Briensbridge - Ogonnelloe - Quilty - Quin - Scariff - Sixmilebridge - Tuamgraney - Tubber - Tulla - Whitegate
    Bunratty - Burren - Doolin - Doonbeg - Ennis - Ennistymon - Kilrush - Lahinch
    Lisdoonvarna - Miltown Malbay - Scarriff - Shannon Airport - Spanish Point

    www.touristr.com/flag/search_results?search=k...
    Spanish Point's Description
    On the coast, 2.5km from Miltown Malbay, Spanish Point was named after the unfortunate Spanish who died here in 1588, when many ships of the Spanish Armada were wrecked during stormy weather. Those who escaped from their sinking ships and made it safely to land were executed by Sir Turlough O’Brien of Liscannor and Boethius Clancy, High Sheriff of County Clare.
    Spanish Point Accommodation-Cheap Spanish Point Accommodations ... -
    Lahiffs Caravan & Camping
    Lahiffs Caravan & Camping is a fully serviced site on the N67 Coast road. The site is within walking distance to restaurants, golf course and beaches. There is a children's play area, electricity points for caravans, washing machines, gas lamps for sale, showers and a food shop on site.
    Spanish Point, Co. Clare -Tel: 065- 7084006
    PLACES TO STAY | Camping | Clare.ie
    Islands
    Aughinish - Inishmore (or Deer) Island - Mutton Island - Scattery Island
    Transport
    Percy French, a 19th Century Balladist, wrote his most famous song Are Ye Right There Michael? lambasting the inefficient rail network in the country at that time – and particularly, the West Clare Railway. French recounts his journey by rail between the Clare towns of Ennis and Kilkee. Unfortunately, bad as the rail network was in French's day, most of the system was closed starting in the 1940s. It was dug up and dismantled by successive governments over several decades in the 1950s, 60s and 70s as it was deemed uneconomic.
    Places of interest
    County Clare is known for beautiful natural scenery.
    Cliffs of Moher
    Doolin
    Ballyea waterfall
    The Burren
    Spanish Point
    Scattery Island only 2km offshore from Kilrush town.
    See also
    Edmund Lenihan
    List of abbeys and priories in the Republic of Ireland, (County Clare)
    External links
    Clare County Council
    Clare County Library for the Archaeology, Folklore, Genealogy, History, Literature, Maps, People, Photos, Places and Placenames of Clare
    Map of Clare
    Meaning of Clare placenames (Co. Clare library)
    General Guide to County Clare
    County Clare photo gallery
    Worthies of Thomond by Robert Herbert- biographical profiles of notable Limerick & Clare people
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    Capital: Ennis
    Interactive Map of Ennis, County Clare, Ireland -
    Ennis Map - Road detailed map of Ennis -
    WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 52°50′47″N 8°58′51″W / 52.8463, -8.9807
    www.irelandtravelpictures.net/Ireland_Irish_t...

    Ennis es una ciudad del Condado de Clare en la costa oeste de Irlanda, a las orillas del río Fergus y a 241 km de Dublin y 67 km de Galway. Es una población de alrededor de 24.000 habitantes. En sus alrededores se encuentran áreas culturales como Galway Bunratty Castle y Killarney.
    Ennis (Irish: Inis, meaning Island) is the county town of Clare in Ireland. Situated on the River Fergus, it lies north of Limerick and south of Galway on the main N18 road connecting these two cities. Its name is a shortening of the original Inis Cluain Ramh Fhada ("Long Rowing Meadow Island"). The town is located only twelve miles from Shannon and Shannon Airport, which provides a large tourist business in the town.
    The 2006 census indicates that Ennis had a population of 24,253 making it the largest town in Munster and the sixth largest town in Ireland. It is the 11th largest urban centre in the country and bigger than the cities of Kilkenny and Armagh. Ennis has a large number of foreign national people living in the town with nationalities including Polish, Slovakian, Czech, Nigerian, and Latvian.
    Heritage and economy
    Ennis grew up around the Franciscan friary. The large building was an important seat of learning at its peak and was built by the O'Brien family in approximately 1242. It was a religious centre until the Dissolution of the Monasteries.
    Ennis is an historically important market town. The market square today is still home to market stalls on each Saturday through the year, although the practice has steadily decreased over the past few decades.
    The Town Centre consists of narrow streets and laneways dating back to medieval times, and many fine old buildings. Of the main thoroughfares, Parnell Street has been pedestrianised, while the others, O'Connell Street, Bindon Street and Abbey Street are one way. The Cathedral of Saint Peter and Saint Paul can also be found in the town.
    Ennis has several major shopping centres and the Town Centre itself (consisting primarily of O'Connell, Parnell and Abbey Streets and the Market area) contains numerous shops, restaurants and pubs.
    Ennis has become an important centre of Irish traditional music over the last fifteen years, and hosts the Fleadh Nua in late May each year, the second largest traditional music festival in Ireland.
    Transport (bus, rail & air services)
    Ennis is served by both bus and rail links to all major cities and towns in Ireland.
    Bus services are provided to Shannon Airport, Galway, Limerick, Cork, Dublin and all routes in between and run nearly every hour. Shannon Airport is 20 minutes from Ennis, providing daily flights to European and US destinations.
    In 1976 passenger trains were withdrawn on the railway line from Limerick to Claremorris via Ennis. County Clare thus became the only Irish county outside Ulster without a passenger train service. The closure of Ennis station proved to be only temporary; fourteen rail services per day are now provided to and from Limerick City, from where connecting rail services are available to both Dublin and Cork. The Western Railway Corridor north of Ennis (to Athenry and Galway) is expected to reopen in 2009.
    Ennis was formerly the starting point of the West Clare Railway, a narrow gauge railway which ran from Ennis to Ennistymon, Miltown Malbay and onwards to the towns and villages along the West Clare coastline. Trains ran from the same railway station as still used by mainline Irish railway services. The line was CIÉ's last narrow gauge railway and was finally closed in 1961, despite investment in new diesel trains in the early/mid 1950s.
    Culture
    Ennis is a stronghold of traditional music with many musicians in residence and regularly playing locally. The town is host each May to the annual Fleadh Nua, a traditional music festival. The Glór Irish Music Centre, hosts music concerts, comedy acts and plays. There is a thriving Rock music scene in Ennis with bands playing at Glor, and Pubs around the town (Brandons, May Kearneys, Charlie Stewarts, Baron McQs).
    People
    Boxer Muhammad Ali's great grandfather Abe Grady was from the Turnpike area of Ennis.
    See also
    List of abbeys and priories in Ireland (County Clare)
    List of towns and villages in Ireland.
    External links
    Wikimedia Commons / Ennis
    Official Ennis website
    Ennis Newspaper
    Fleadh Nua
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    Did you know?
    Ten Irish people have won Nobel prizes: William Butler Yeats (Literature), George Bernard Shaw (Literature), Samuel Beckett (Literature), Seamus Heaney (Literature), Sean MacBride (Peace), Mairead Corrigan and Betty Williams (Peace), John Hume and David Trimble (Peace), and Ernest Thomas Sinton Walton (Physics).
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    Clare, known as the 'Banner County' is also the County of seascapes and landscapes.
    Clare plays host to two of the Country's natural attractions.
    Firstly, the Cliffs of Moher and secondly, The Burren, whose geology, flora, caves, archaeology and history set it apart as a place of great mystery and beauty. The River Shannon and Lough Derg form the eastern boundary of County Clare.
    On the west is the wonderfully varied Atlantic coast, with mighty cliffs, caverns and sandy bays. To the north this rugged coast rises nearly 700 feet above the sea in the sheer Cliffs of Moher; here also is the amazing limestone district called the Burren, with its many caves, underground streams and rare flora. On the south is the broad Shannon estuary, where Ireland's greatest river meets the sea.
    Main Tourist Attractions
    · Ailwee Cave - Ballyvaughan
    Located near Ballyvaughan, with its stalactites and stalagmites, the Aillwee Cave beneath the Burren has become one of Irelands leading attractions. An essential part of a visit to the Burren, it affords the opportunity to travel through beautiful caverns, over bridged chasms and under weird formations.
    · Biddy Early Brewery - Inagh
    Located at Inagh, just 10 mile from Ennis on the Lahinch Road. Ireland's first pub-brewery is named after a Clare woman by the name of Biddy Early, who was renowned for her magical powers in the 1800s. Since it's opening in 1995 the brewery has continued to produce a unique selection of hand crafted beers in memory of the great woman. These include Black Biddy, Red Biddy, Blonde Biddy and Real Biddy.
    · Bunratty Castle and Folk Park - Bunratty
    One of Irelands top visitor attractions, Bunratty Castle is the most complete and authentic medieval castle in the country. Built in 1425, it was faithfully restored in 1954 and has furnishings and tapestries which capture the mood and style of the times. The Folk Park, set in 26 acres, recreates nineteenth century Ireland. The Park features include a recreated village street, eight farmhouses, a watermill, blacksmiths forge, Macs pub and restaurant and a display of nineteenth century agricultural machinery.
    · Cliffs of Moher - Lahinch
    Located just north of Lahinch on the coast of West Clare, are the Cliffs of Moher. Natural ramparts against the might of the Atlantic, they rise in places to over 215m and stretch for almost 8km.

    · Corofin Heritage Museum - Corofin
    This award winning Heritage Museum is housed in what was once Saint Catherine's Church, which was built in 1718 by a cousin of Queen Anne. Its main theme, 'Ireland West 1800 - 1860' portrays a traumatic period of Irish history under the headings of 'Lan d'Tenure', 'The Famine', 'Emigration', 'Education', 'Irish Language and Music' and others.
    · Craggaunowen - Quin
    Located at Quin, is Irelands original prize winning centre dedicated to interpreting Irelands prehistoric and early Christian eras. The exhibits around the grounds include a Ring Fort, a true reproduction of a farmers house dating from the 4th or 5th centuries, an Iron Age roadway and an outdoor cooking site. Also featured is the Brendan, the leather hulled boat which Tim Severin sailed from Ireland to North America, re-enacting the voyage of Saint Brendan, who is reputed to have discovered that continent before Columbus.
    · Killaloe Heritage Centre - Killaloe
    This centre elaborates on the theme of Celtic Ireland. Discover the history of the arrival of Christianity and the monastic tradition, as well as the development of the Shannon River as a transport system from early times.
    · Knappogue Castle - Quin
    Located near Quin was the pride of 42 castles built by the McNamara tribe who dominated the area for over 1,000 years. Built in 1467, it has over five troubled but colourful centuries of Irish history, given soccour to both friend and foe within its keep - including Cromwellian troops who occupied it in 1641
    · Lahinch Seaworld - Lahinch
    Located on the promenade in Lahinch is a dramatic new attraction where visitors can see and experience the underwater life of the Atlantic Coast. Sharks, rays and congor eels, starfish, lobsters and flatfish can all be viewed in a giant aquarium.
    · Newtown Castle - Newtown
    Located in the Burren, is a beautifully restored sixteenth Century round towerhouse. A tour of the castle's four floors reveals its unique architectural features and presents its social, cultural, political and historical context with rare exhibits including a limited edition facsimile copy of the Book of Kells. Adjacent to the castle is Newtown Nature Trail, a 1300m long guided walk. The trail covers an area of the Burren rich in natural and historical features.
    · The Burren Centre - Kilfenora
    Located in the ancient Cathedral town of Kilfenora, the centre introduces you to one of the most enigmatic areas in the world - the Burren District. Models, displays and audio-visuals reveal the mysteries and complexities of this unique area. The centre contains the greatest concentrations of high crosses in Ireland. Visitors can explore the geology and geography of the areas, including the rich diversity of Burren flora and fauna and the history of man in his landscape. For info on walks or guided tours of Burren
    · The Great Stalactite at Doolin Cave - Doolin
    Discovered in 1959, the Great Stalactite at Doolin Cave, Co. Clare, is set to become one of the most important eco-tourist attractions in Ireland. Measuring 6.54 metres (20 feet) in length, it is recognised as being the longest stalactite in the Northern hemisphere. Doolin Cave is located on the western edge of The Burren, an extensive karst area of North West Clare. The Burren is Ireland's most important cave area. This mystical, lunar-limestone region is punctuated by a large number of active stream caves, yet only one river runs overground through its terrain to reach the sea. Over 35 miles of cave passages have been surveyed in the region, with the Doolin Cave considered the most significant and fascinating of all.
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    ¿Lo sabía?
    Los colores del Condado de Clare, azul y oro, son supuestamente los colores que portaba Brian Boru en la Batalla de Clontarf en 1014.
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    Clare
    Haga un recorrido de Clare, y descubrirá espectaculares acantilados, paisajes evocadores y algunos de los pueblecitos más típicos de Irlanda
    Clare es un condado en el Oeste de Irlanda que no podrás olvidar una vez que lo hayas visitado. Desde los recortados acantilados de Moher a los paisajes lunares y místicos del Burren, las atracciones naturales de Clare despertarán tu admiración desde el primer momento.
    El condado está repleto de paisajes excepcionales, desde el agreste encanto de la costa Atlántica, azotada por las olas y el viento, al famoso Río Shannon y el Lago Derg.
    Los pueblos llenos de encanto te envolverán en una atmósfera típica, en sus pubs, con excelente música tradicional y gente de espíritu tranquilo, mientras que el condado bulle con el sinfín de actividades al aire libre que puede practicar: deportes acuáticos, surf, pesca, golf, hípica, senderismo y ciclismo. Visita Clare, y nunca te faltará algo que hacer.
    Traditional Irish Music Session
    TEMPLE GATE HOTEL - Weekend 2 nights B and B + 1 dinner
    Traditional Music
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    Diríjase al Oeste para encontrar salvajes paisajes y una sublime línea costera barrida por el Atlántico
    Una visita al Oeste de Irlanda es la mejor forma de experimentar lo que Irlanda tiene que ofrecer en vacaciones. Ya sea maravillarse ante paisajes incomparables, o hacer un crucero por tranquilos canales, o disfrutar de festivales de arte internacionales. Ribeteada por la salvaje y dramática costa atlántica, se trata de una zona repleta de acantilados imponentes, playas doradas y tranquilas calas, todo en una de las costas más occidentales de Europa.
    Tiene paisaje dramático como las islas de Aran, el río Shannon, y los prados verdes y acantilados vertiginosos de Donegal. La zona del Oeste comprende los condados de Clare, Donegal, Galway, Leitrim, Limerick, Mayo, Roscommon, Sligo, Offaly y Tipperary y ofrece un mundo de oportunidades para pasar unas vacaciones inolvidables. Esta zona también ofrece la oportunidad para conocer a la Irlanda verdadera dentro del Gaeltacht, una zona donde todavía hablan entre ellos en gaélico.
    Aquí sabrás de verdad si tu vértigo supera los 214 metros de acantilado perpendicular enfrentándote a los Cliffs de Moher, en el condado de Clare, si no te han arrestado antes los sentidos la Slieve League de Donegal o la costa de Mayo con sus acantilados imposibles.

    Por encima de todo, esta área es una explosión de cultura, leyendas y patrimonio natural – desde Benbulben en el condado de Sligo, que tanto inspiró al poeta WB Yeats, el paisaje místico y lunar del parque nacional el Burren en el condado de Clare, hasta las historias de la Irlanda pre-celta que podrás escuchar en en el centro interpretativo de Lough Gur, condado de Limerick. Demasiado bueno para perdérselo.
    Hay 5 aeropuertos en esta zona - Shannon, Galway, Knock, Donegal y la Ciudad de Derry así que nunca ha sido tan fácil planear tus vacaciones al Oeste de Irlanda.
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  9. #1669
    Usuario Avatar de Nettus
    Fecha de ingreso
    01 feb, 08
    Ubicación
    Lundby
    Mensajes
    4,725

    Predeterminado Galway

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    21. Condado: Galway - Capital: Galway
    Province: Connacht - Area: 6,148 km2 - Population: ~ 235.000 - www.galway.ie

    www.countygalway.com/galway_map.htm
    Select a Town - Click on the Map to select a town
    Annaghdown - Aran islands - Ardrahan - Athenry - Aughrim - Ballinasloe - Ballyconneely - Ballygar - Ballymoe - Ballynahonn - Barna - Bealadangan - Bushypark - Carna - Carnmore - Carraroe - Carrowkeel - Cashel - Cashel bay - Castlegar - Claregalway - Clarinbridge - Cleggan - Clifden - Clonbur - Connemara - Cornamona - Corrandulla - Costelloe - Craughwell - Deerpark - Dunmore - Eyrecourt - Foxhall - Furbo - Galway City - Glenamaddy - Glinsk - Gort - Gorumna island - Headford - Headford road - Inishbofin - Inishere - Inishmore - Inveran - Island of carna - Kilcolgan - Kilconnell - Kilkieran - Kilronan - Kinvara - Knockferry - Knocknacarra - Kylemore - Laurencetown - Leenane - Letterfrack - Lettermore - Loughrea - - Maam cross - Meelick - Monivea - Mountbellew - Moyard - Moycullen - Newcastle - Oranmore - Oughterard - Portumna - Rahoon - Recess - Renmore - Renvyle - Rosmuc - Rosmuck - Rossaveal - Rosscahill - Roundstone - Salthill - Shrule - Spiddal - St. macdara's island - Tuam - Williamstown - Woodford

    El Condado de Galway, en inglés County Galway (en irlandés: Contae na Gaillimhe) se encuentra en la costa oeste de Irlanda. Forma parte de la provincia de Connacht. Su capital es la ciudad de Galway. El condado contiene varias áreas, conocidas como Gaeltacht, en las que aún se habla el idioma irlandés.
    History
    The county comprises a number of distinct territories which predate the formation of the county by the English colonial administration in Ireland in the late 1500s. The major ones are Iar Connacht, or 'West Connacht', which covers the portion of the county (and also a small part of County Mayo) west of Loch Corrib and which contains Connemara in the far west and Joyce Country in the north-west. The territory of Aidhne lies in the south of the county and is coextensive with the diocese of Kilmacduagh.
    The territory of what was once known as Uí Maine or Tír Maine covers most of the east of the county but also covers south County Roscommon. Maigh Seola covers the portion of the county along the eastern side of Lough Corrib. A number of inhabited islands are administered by the county; they include Oileáin Árann (Aran Islands) and Inis Bó Fine (Inishbofin).
    The first inhabitants in the Galway area arrived over 7000 years ago. Shell middens tell us about the existence of people as early as 5000 BC.
    With the arrival of Christianity many monasteries were built.
    Geography
    County Galway is home to Lough Corrib (the largest lake in the Republic of Ireland) the Na Beanna Beola (Twelve Bens) mountain range, Na Sléibhte Mhám Toirc (the Maum Turk mountains), and the low mountains of Sliabh Echtghe (Slieve Aughty).
    The highest point in the county is one of the Twelve Bens, Benbaun, at 729m.

    Eyre Square, Galway
    Towns and villages
    Ahascragh, Ardrahan, Athenry, Aughrim, Ballinasloe, Ballinderreen, Ballyconneely, Ballygar, Ballymoe, Ballynahinch, Barna, Bealadangan, Bullaun, Camus, Carnmore, Carraroe, Casla, Castlegar, Claregalway, Clarinbridge, Cleggan, Clifden, Clonbur, Corofin, Corrandulla, Corr na Móna, Craughwell,Dunmore,Furbo, Glenamaddy, Gort, Headford, Hollygrove, Inverin, Kilcolgan, Kilconnell, Kilkerrin, Kilkieran, Killimor, Kilronan, Kiltullagh, Kinvara,Laurencetown, Lebane, Leenaun, Lettercallow, Letterfrack, Lettermore, Loughrea, Maam Cross, Maum, Monivea, Mountbellew, Moycullen, Muckanaghederdauhaulia, Newbridge, New Inn, Oranmore, Oughterard, Peterswell, Portumna, Recess, Rosmuck, Rossaveal, Roundstone, Spiddal, Tuam, Turloughmore, Williamstown, Woodford.
    See also
    Connacht Irish
    Galway East (Dáil Éireann constituency)
    Galway West (Dáil Éireann constituency)
    Galway GAA
    List of abbeys and priories in the Republic of Ireland (County Galway)
    External links
    Galway County Council
    Tourist information website
    Map of Galway
    *FLIRT FM* Galways Student Radio Station NUIG/GMIT
    Galway GAA
    Connemara National Park

    )))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))) )))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))) )))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))) Galway (Gaillimh en irlandés) es la capital del condado de Galway, en Irlanda. La ciudad se encuentra en la costa oeste de la isla, en el rincón noroccidental de la bahía de Galway (53°17′N 9°04′E / 53.28, 9.06). El río Corrib atraviesa la ciudad. Juvenil y dinámica, es una de las ciudades con más crecimiento económico de la Unión Europea y resulta difícil precisar su número de habitantes (The population of Galway city and its environs is 72,729 (based on the 2006 census carried out by the CSO),
    pues aumenta constantemente con la llegada de estudiantes a cualquiera de sus dos universidades, la National University of Ireland, Galway y la MGIT, así como de trabajadores extranjeros, en gran parte españoles.
    The city takes its name from the Gaillimh river (River Corrib) that formed the western boundary of the earliest settlement, which was called Dún Bhun na Gaillimhe, or the fort at the bottom of the Gaillimh. The word Gaillimh means "stony" as in "stony river". (the mythical and alternative derivations are given in History of Galway.) The city also bears the nickname City of the Tribes / Cathair na dTreabh, because fourteen “Tribes” (merchant families) led the city in its Hiberno-Norman period. The term Tribes was originally a derogatory phrase from Cromwellian times. The merchants would have seen themselves as English nobility, and hence were loyal to the King. Their uncertain reaction to the siege of Galway by Cromwellian forces earned them this label, which they subsequently adopted in defiance. It is one of the constituent cities of the Cork-Limerick-Galway corridor with a population of 1 million people.
    Historia Antigua
    Con más de ocho siglos desde su fundación, Galway, en gaélico Gaillimh (de gall y am, "río rocoso"), debe su nombre al lecho de piedras del Corrib, el río que la atraviesa. Aunque, si hemos de creer en las leyendas, el origen del topónimo se hallaría en la mitología celta, según la cual Galvia, hija del rey Breasal, se ahogó cerca de una roca en el Corrib. Finalmente, una corriente minoritaria de historiadores defiende que el nombre es una derivación del término latino Gallaeci (Galicia), tierra con la que los ancestros de Galway habrían tenido fluidas relaciones desde tiempos muy remotos.

    Galway Harbour.
    Desde su fundación
    El nacimiento de la ciudad tuvo lugar en el siglo XIII cuando Richard de Burgo, uno de los invasores anglonormandos, llegó a estas latitudes e intentó tomar el castillo defendido por el clan local de los O'Flaherty. Tras dos años de asedios, consiguió su objetivo. Desde 1232, acosada por las tribus irlandesas, la villa de Galway creció amurallada y fiel al trono inglés. De la mano de los dirigentes normandos, unas cuantas familias monopolizaron los principales negocios. Esta fue la génesis de las llamadas catorce tribus de Galway, apelativo que los soldados de Oliver Cromwell dedicarían siglos después a los poderes fácticos de la ciudad. En los albores del siglo XIV, la villa ya comenzaba a perfilarse como un pujante puerto comercial en el que los vinos españoles eran muy apreciados. Quizá la más importante de esas familias fue la de los Lynch que construyeron la iglesia de Saint Nicholas, considerada como la segunda parroquia medieval más grande y mejor conservada de Irlanda.
    Relación con España
    La ciudad de Galway fue destino habitual de barcos españoles en los siglos XV y XVI, en el antiguo muelle aun se conservan arcos, justo delante del Spanish Parade. El comercio del vino,el cual era el centro de casi todas las transacciones comerciales en Galway; la pesca del salmón, disputada entre franceses, portugueses, ingleses y españoles, los cuales se salieron con la suya cuando Felipe II accedió a pagar 1.000 libras por el derecho español a pescar, la lucha contra el protestantismo y la común aversión a Inglaterra propiciaron una gran cooperación. "Todo en esta ciudad tiene un aire a España." Cuando el viajero escocés Robert Graham visitó Galway en 1836, escribió que la soberbia, que según él era típica de la península Ibérica, definía a sus habitantes, y que en los callejones se podía percibir el ambiente de duelo e indolencia propio de latitudes más meridionales. Aunque sus afirmaciones pueden considerarse hoy algo desfasadas, es imposible negar que Galway todavía conserva su vocación de puerto español y -robándole los versos a José Agustín Goytisolo- el deseo de ser capital de los mares, albergue de extranjeros y patria de los valientes.
    Sitios de interés
    Si Desea visitar Galway ,le recomendamos que coja el avion en Shannon , un pueblo situado a 16km al norte de Galway.
    En Irlanda podra encontrar los B&B que significa bed and breckfast (desayuno y cama) donde alquila una habitación , mas barata que los hoteles , y más practico ya que que los turistas desayunan y van de turismo ...
    ***La Catedral Católica de Nuestra señora de la Asunción y San Nicolás

    El arco español
    Parte de las paredes de la ciudad de la original y de un lugar preferido para relajar y para comtemplar el viejo comercio y las relaciones culturales con nuestros amigos españoles. ¡Columbus aterrizó aquí - pero fue descubierto antes eso!

    ***El museo de Galway y los Arcos españoles (City Museum and Spanish Archs)
    ***Nora Barnacle's museum pequeño museo (solamente abierto en verano) dedicado a James Joyce, uno de los más grandes escritores irlandeses. El museo está situado en la antigua casa de de Nora Barnacle, la esposa de James Joyce.
    ***El castillo de los Lynch antigua mansión de la familia Lynch, una de las 12 tribus de Galway, situada en la esquina de Shop Street con la Abbey Gate Street Upper. Es un buen ejemplo de conservación y adaptación de edificios antiguos a ciudades modernas: Actualmente se encuentran aquí una sucursal del AIB en Galway.
    ***El tribunal de Justicia y el antiguo Ayuntamiento (Court House & Town Hall). Ambos datan de 1818 pero han sufrido muchas rehabilitaiones. El ayuntamiento se trasladó en 1901. Actualmente sirve como teatro.

    ***St. Nicholas Church de la Iglesia de Irlanda, fundada en 1320, gracias a la célebre familia Lynch, en honor a Saint Nicolas de Myra, santo patrón de los marinos. Recibió la visita de Cristóbal Colón en 1477.
    ***El molino del puente (Bridge Mills) situado a uno de los lados del puente O'Brien, sobre el río Corrib.
    ***La calle de las compras (Shop Street) construida en el siglo XVIII.
    ***La presa y el puente de Salmón. El puente del salto del Salmon fue construido en 1818
    ***El festival de música medieval de Galway (Galway Early Music Festival)
    ***El festival de las ostras en Galway. (Galway Oyster Festival)
    ***Galway Races. Seguramente las más famosas carreras de caballos de Irlanda.
    Major squares in the city include Eyre Square, in the centre of the city; and Spanish Parade, next to the Spanish Arch.
    In 2007, Galway was named as one of the eight "sexiest cities" in the world.
    A 2008 poll ranked Galway as the 42nd best tourist destination in the world, or 14th in Europe and 2nd in Ireland (behind Dingle). It was ranked ahead of all European capitals except Edinburgh, and many traditional tourist destinations (such as Venice).

    The remains of Galway to Clifden Railway line bridge at Galway City over the River Corrib
    Culture
    Irish language and Culture - Architecture - Museum - Events - Theatre -Music
    Infrastructure -Airports -Buses -Waterways -Railway
    Road
    Three national primary roads serve the city: the N17 from the North (Tuam, Sligo, Donegal), the N6 from the East (Athlone, Dublin), and the N18 from the South (Shannon Town, Limerick and Cork). The M4 motorway connects Dublin to Kinnegad and the M6 motorway connects Kinnegad to Athlone; work on extending the M6 motorway to Galway is underway. By 2015, the Galway-Dublin (by 2010), Galway-Limerick and Galway-Tuam routes will be motorway or high-quality dual-carriageway standard.
    In addition, there are plans for a semi-ring road of the city, the Galway City Outer Bypass, which should also be complete by 2015. There is also an Inner City Ring (Cuar Inmheánach) route that encircles the city centre, most of which is pedestrianised.
    Galway is considered the gateway to Connemara and the Gaeltacht. The N59 along the western shore of Lough Corrib and the R337 along the northern shore of Galway Bay both lead to this wild and romantic region.
    Bus travel to the city from all major towns and airports is serviced by many private operators and the national bus company Bus Éireann.
    Galway Harbour
    Galway is the most central port on the West Coast of Ireland in the sheltered eastern corner of Galway Bay. The harbour can be used by vessels up to 10,000 metric tons of deadweight (DWT) and the inner dock can accommodate up to 9 vessels at any one time. Pending approval, Galway Harbour may see major changes, should the €1.5 billion development plan go ahead.
    With Rossaveal and Doolin, it is one of the gateways to the Oileáin Árann.
    Commuter ferry services have been proposed to the commuter town of Kinvara, on the opposite side of Galway Bay.
    Crime
    Galway is located in the Garda Western Region, which has the lowest crime rate in the country. It has been claimed that Galway is the safest city in Ireland. In 2005 the official figures for 'Galway West' show that the headline crime rate was 23.33 per 1,000 people, compared to Cork city's 27.81 crimes per 1,000 people and Dublin's 39.15 crimes per 1,000 people. In 2007 the crime rate had fallen further from the 2005 rate, despite some high-profile assault cases

    Explore Galway - Galway Guides
    Introduction - Entertainment - Where to Stay - Tours - History - Restaurants and Bars
    View Galway pictures - Read 16 reviews of Galway - Write a review of Galway
    Book a Galway Flight, Hotel or Holiday
    Where to eat & what to do
    Popular Restaurants in Galway
    Brannagan's - Druid Lane - Graal (Le) - Nimmo's - Biquets - Eddie Rocket's -
    An Tobhar Nua - Kirby's of Cross Street - Kirwan's Lane Restaurant -
    Maxwell McNamara's - List all Restaurants
    Popular Attractions in Galway
    Kirwan's Lane - Riverside Walk - Connemara Heritage and History Centre (The)
    Fountain (The) - Turoe Stone (The) - Caesars Palace Snooker Club - Claude's Casino
    Connemara Marble - Body and Sole Centre - St. Mary's Church of Ireland Cathedral
    List all Attractions
    Popular Hotels in Galway
    Radisson SAS Hotel Galway - Glenlo Abbey Hotel - Hotel Meyrick
    Quality Hotel & Leisure Centre - Westwood House Hotel -
    Clarinbridge Court Hotel Galway - The Hanley Oaks Hotel - Jurys Inn Galway
    Galway Bay Golf & Country Club Hotel - The House Hotel - List all Hotels
    Introduction - Not to miss - Roads in Ireland - Facts for the Traveller - Getting there & Getting around - Galway - Galway - tourist attractions - Getting around Galway
    History of Galway - Galway Races - Galway accommodation - Galway Cathedral
    Eyre Square - St. Nicholas' Collegiate Church - Nora Barnacle House - Lynch's Castle
    Spanish Arch
    Vill du se fler bilder från Galway tryck här! <<< (Fotos)
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    Galway is a large county divided into two contrasting regions by the expanse of Lough Corrib.
    To the west, lying between the lake and the Atlantic, is Connemara - a region of superb scenic grandeur dominated by the rocky mountain range known as the Twelve Pins. A great many of the inhabitants are Irish speakers, and much of the ancient Gaelic culture is preserved. Galway East, or East of Lough Corrib, is a fertile limestone plain extends to Roscommon.
    Galway city, known as the 'city of the tribes' with its seaside suburb of Salthill, is an important tourist centre and a gateway to the scenic areas of the county.
    In the 1400's, there began in Galway the rule of the 'Tribes', as the leading fourteen families were called. Their names were Athy, Blake, Bodkin, Browne, Darcy, Deane, ffont, French, Joyce, Kirwan, Lynch, Martin, Morris, and Skerritt
    Members of these families served as Burgesses, and as Mayors of Galway up to the capture of Galway by a Cromwellian army in 1652.

    Calle de Quay - El punto focal para la reunión, el saludo, comer, beber, la música y la canción. El cuarto latino de Galway es el lugar para usted si es joven o los jóvenes en el corazón. No tenga prisa y no sea un extranjero.
    www.roadtoireland.eu/Ireland_Galway.html
    Main Tourist Attractions
    · Athenry - Mediaval Town with Arts and Heritage Centre - Athenry
    Amedieval town situated 23km from Galway City is steeped in history. Founded in the 13th century by Meiler de Birmingham, who surrounded the town with a curtain wall with towers and a moat. It is the only walled town in Ireland whose still-intact walls are clearly visible to the approaching visitor
    · Battle of Aughrim Interpretative Centre - Aughrim
    Relive the bloodiest battle in Irish history fought in a small Connaught village. Move back in time and place to that fateful day in 1691 through an audio-visual show based on the moving account of Captain Walter Dalton who fought at the Battle of Aughrim.
    · Clifden in West Galway - Clifden
    The location of the landing of the first Trans-Atlantic air crossing by Alcock and Brown. A very scenic part of Ireland.
    · Coole Park - Gort
    Located close to Gort, on the Galway Road, the former home of Lady Gregory, a founder of the Abbey Theatre and friend of William Butler Yeats. The house no longer stands, but the estate is now a national nature reserve. The garden of the house, with its yew walk and autograph tree is preserved. Carved on the autograph tree, among others are the signatures of John Masefield, George Bernard Shaw and Sean O'Casey. Attractions include nature trails, walks, a lake and turlough.
    · Dunguaire Castle - kinvara
    Dunguaire Castle was built by the O'Hynes in 1520. The clans association with the castle dates back as far as 662AD when their ancestor Guaire, King of Connnacht, ruled his kingdom from an earthwork rath close to the present castle site. Richhad Martyn, Mayor of Galway, acquired the castle in the seventeenth century and it was subsequently purchased by Oliver Saint John Gogarty. During his tenure the castle was the venue for meetings of the literary revivalists, led by W.B Yeats. The bardic tradition which Yeats believed in, is reflected in the Medieval Banquet held every night.
    · Eyre Square - Galway City - Galway City
    Eyre Square (renamed John F Kennedy Park) ; an open green park where on can relax or view the many attractions, including the Statue of Paraic O'Connaire ; erected in 1935 in memory of the writer who travelled the roads with his horse and cart. Best remembered for M'asal Beag Dubh. Died 1928
    · Galway Bay - Galway City
    Drive along the coast road from Galway to Spiddal and view the splendour of Galway Bay. Later in the day one can experience the famed in song 'Sun go down on Galway Bay' Continuing West takes one into the Twelve Pins of Connemara mountain range.
    · Kinvara - Galway Hooker Boats - Kinvara
    Kinvara hosts an annual festival to celebrate those unique sea boats each year. Always a selection of the old style Hooker boats on view. Those boats were used to transport turf in bygone days.
    · Kirwan's Lane - Galway City - Galway City
    Kirwan's Lane (off Quay Street) is one of Galway's last remaining late Mediaeval Lanes and has been recently redeveloped as a residential area. It was here that the Galway MP Richard Martin built a 100-seater theatre for his actress wife in 1783. Among those who acted there was the republican patriot, Wolfe Tone.
    · Mill Museum - Tuam - Tuam
    This is the last surviving corn mill in the Tuam area. It closed as a working mill in 1964 - its machinery is still in place, however, so visitors can view the old milling process. This mill played a vital part in the life of the local community and a voluntary committee opened it as a museum in 1974. It also serves as a seasonal tourist information office.
    · Portumna Castle - Portuma
    The great semi-fortifed house at Portumna was built before 1618 by Richard Burke or de Burgo, 4th Earl of Clanricarde. There are exhibitions in the castle and Gate House.
    · Quiet Man Film Locations - Cong
    County Galway has several locations which were used in the making of the file. The Quiet Man. Visit the main film locations in an organised tour or join the Quiet Man Fan Club.
    · St. Jarlaths Wheel - Tuam - Tuam
    Located beside the Catholic Cathedral in the North Galway town of Tuam. Tuam is also home to a 13th century parish church ruins and graveyard, located at Teampall Jarlath, High St. Tuam.
    · The Aran Islands - located in Galway Bay - Aran Islands
    Situated at the mouth of Galway bay. Day trips available from Galway and Clare coasts. Organised tours available on the Islands. Visit the cottage where J.M. Synge, the well-known Anglo-Irish author and playwright stayed and took the theme of The Playboy of the Western World.
    · Thoor Ballylee - Gort
    Once the former summer home of W.B. Yeats this restored Norman tower house was purchased by Yeats in 1916. In 1965 the tower was opened to the public. An audio visual presentation and push button audio narratives in the rooms are available in the tower, which is open to the public from Easter to October.
    · Tropical Butterfly Centre - Casla
    2 miles from Rossaveal Harbour on R343. Located in the heart of Connemara, Seawinds Nurseries and Tropical Butterfly Centre offers a unique experience in family entertainment, regardless of weather. Set amid the lush splendour of a tropical enclosure, you can see hundreds of free flying exotic Butterflies in their natural environment.
    · Turoe Pet Farm - Loughrea
    In a beautiful rural setting, Turoe Pet Farm provides great attractions for young and old, native and tourist! Excellent facilities are provided catering for individual, family and group needs
    Heritage Sites
    · Athenry Castle - Athenry
    Athenry is one of the most notable medieval walled towns surviving in Ireland, owing its foundation to Meiler de Bermingham who built his Castle there c.1250. The great three-storey tower, surrounded by defensive walls, is entered at first-floor level through an unusual decorated doorway. Recently re-roofed, the interior contains an audio visual room and exhibition.
    · Aughnanure Castle Galway - Oughterard
    Built by the O'Flahertys c. 1500, Aughnanure Castle lies in picturesque surroundings close to the shores of Lough Corrib. Standing on what is virtually a rocky island, the Castle is a particularly well-preserved example of an Irish tower house. In addition, visitors will find the remains of a banqueting hall, a watch tower, an unusual double bawn and bastions and a dry harbour.
    · Dun Aonghasa - Aran Islands
    Inishmore. Perched spectacularly on a cliff overlooking the Atlantic ocean, this is the largest of the prehistoric stone forts of the Aran Islands. It is enclosed by three massive dry-stone walls and a "chevaux-de-frise" consisting of tall blocks of limestone set vertically into the ground to deter attackers. The fort is about 900m from the Visitor Centre and is approached over rising ground.
    · Teach an Phiarsaigh - Rosmuc
    (Patrick Pearse's Cottage) Rosmuc, A small restored cottage used by Patrick Pearse (1879 - 1916) leader of the 1916 Rising, as a summer residence. The interior, although burned during the War of Independence, has been reconstructed and contains an exhibition and a number of momentoes of Pearse.
    ¿Que ver y que hacer en el condado de Galway?
    ¿ Que ver y que hacer en la ciudad de Galway?
    Historia - ¿Comó llegar a Galway? - Galería de Fotos
    - La cocina irlandesa - La cultura irlandesa - Información útil
    el condado de Galway y del Connemara - County Galway - Oueste ... -
    Guia de Viajes de Condado de Galway - Turismo en Condado de Galway ... -
    Irlanda, los veinte lugares más románticos
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    Lo sabía?
    La historia de los ponys de Connemara se remonta a hace 2.500 años, y es considerada la única raza nativa de Irlanda
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    Galway
    Haga un viaje al maravilloso y agreste condado de Galway para vivir una experiencia única
    Un condado sorprendente, impregnado de un ambiente único, Galway, en el Oeste de Irlanda se convertirá en algo suyo, como ninguna otra parte del mundo puede hacerlo.
    Sorprendente, misterioso, y salvaje, el paisaje agreste a veces parece implacable, a veces está lleno de color y salpicado de unos lagos perfectos y tranquilos.
    La zona Gaeltacht del Condado de Galway ofrece una visión auténtica de la vida a través de la lengua irlandesa, y las islas Aran nos muestran una belleza sobrecogedora y un ambiente realmente especial.
    Además de todo esto, Galway tiene estupendas playas, elevadas montañas, preciosos pueblos, fabulosos pubs, y algunas de las gentes más amables del país. Venga a verlo todo de cerca y a descubrir más...
    Your Gateway to Galway
    Safety Direct Galway International Rally 2009
    Merriman Winter School - Scoil Gheimhridh Merriman
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    Galway, la Bahia verde
    La ciudad de Galway representa uno de los más bellos condados del litoral irlandés. Los visitantes acuden una y otra vez a esta región, animados por el popurrí de contrastes que ofrece. Las remotas zonas rurales se confunden con las más vibrantes y populares ciudades.
    La ciudad de Galway se halla en la desembocadura de la Bahía de Galway. Es una pintoresca y animada ciudad, con fascinantes tiendas especializadas en la artesanía local. Precisamente la artesanía local es una de las principales características de la región, incluyendo tejidos, cerámica, vidrio, joyería y madera.
    La ciudad tiene muchas reliquias de su pasado medieval y vale la pena tomarse el tiempo para explorarla. Realmente ha cambiado considerablemente con el paso de los años y es de destacar el contraste entre la vieja y la moderna arquitectura de sus calles. Un paseo por el centro de Galway es de lo más recomendado que os podemos ofrecer.
    Galway tiene una gran variedad de actividades que ofrecernos. Maravillosos campos de golf, paseos a caballo, senderismo en torno a la ciudad y sus zonas rurales. Son preciosas en especial las rutas por Connemara, donde el paisaje es inmejorable. Además, la costa es un buen lugar para la práctica de deportes náuticos. La pesca es otra de las opciones que nos ofrece Galway.

    La playa de la bandera azul de Galway (una concesión para las instalaciones y la limpieza) está a 3 millas al oeste de la ciudad, así que usted necesitará un coche para esto, pero está bien digno de una visita.
    www.crookhaven.net / www.crookhaven.net/attractions.php
    Dentro de la ciudad de Galway podemos admirar la Torre Ballylee, torre que compró el poeta ingles W.B. Yeats en 1916, así como sus casas adyacentes. Él consideró este lugar como lugar de su retiro e inspiración. Su colección de poemas La Torre contiene varios poemas escritos en la torre Ballylee. Hoy en día es un lugar que se puede visitar para conocer la vida que el poeta inglés tuvo allí en la década de los 20.
    Se puede recorrer la torre a través de una presentación audiovisual. Además, hay hermosos jardines y una zona de pic-nic, una tienda de artesanía y una oficina de información turística. Otro castillo asociado con Yeats es el Castillo Dunguaire.
    Otro de los emblemas de la ciudad es el famoso salmón de Galway. Hay incluso una ruta que realiza el recorrido de este pez, desde el río Corrib a la Bahía de Galway. Allí llegaréis al Acuario Nacional, que presenta una visión completa del mundo del agua, recreando hábitats naturales de los fondos marinos locales. Allí podéis sumergiros en un submarino, para vivir la sensación de estar bajo el agua.
    Cómo llegar
    La mejor forma de llegar a Galway es a través de su aeropuerto, que tiene conexiones directas con Dublín, Manchester y Edimburgo. Desde el aeropuerto, un autobús os acercará a la ciudad, donde podréis alojaros y organizar los distintos viajes que os llevarán a conocer toda la zona. También podéis coger un taxi, y el precio desde el aeropuerto hasta Galway es de 15 euros.
    (Por Jose Manuel Vargas)(sobreirlanda.com)
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  10. #1670
    Usuario Avatar de Nettus
    Fecha de ingreso
    01 feb, 08
    Ubicación
    Lundby
    Mensajes
    4,725

    Predeterminado Dublín, Wicklow, Wexford- Atracciones turísticas

    Dublín, Wicklow, Wexford- Atracciones turísticas
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    Dublín
    Tiendas modernas, pubs con mucha marcha y un montón de historia hacen de Dublín un destino único
    Con su mezcla de estilo urbano, exuberantes zonas verdes, fantástica costa y boutiques de las mejores marcas, Dublín, Condado de Dublín, late con energía a la vez que conserva un ambiente acogedor y relajado.
    Una de las capitales europeas más emocionantes, Dublín esta ubicada en la Costa Este y ofrece al visitante todo lo que se puede esperar de un destino en el que pasar unos días: historia, cultura y más pubs de los que pueda imaginar.
    Afortunadamente ver todo lo que Dublín ofrece no le va a costar tanto como cree, puesto que puede ahorrar dinero en más de 30 atracciones por toda la ciudad al comprar su Dublin Pass antes de ir.
    ¿Lo sabía?
    Dublín se llamó originariamente Dubh Linn, que significa Estanque Negro. El estanque original es el más antiguo conocido en Europa del Norte y se encuentra en el centro del recinto de los pingüinos en el Zoo de Dublín.
    Main Tourist Attractions
    · A trip along the Liffey - Dublin City
    As Eddie Rabbit said in the Commitments there are two Dublin's, North & South. The Liffey is the border. The river rises in the Wicklow mountains near Poulaphuca , south of Dublin. it enters the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay. It is over 120Kms long. It is spanned by many bridges in the city. The first one is Sean Heuston bridge, located near the entrance to the Phoenix Park, the last bridge is the East link bridge, not far east of the Customs House. The sights along the Liffey include the National Museum, Customs House and Guinness Brewery.
    · Bull Island - Dublin City
    Bull Island is 5km long and 800m wide, and the area above high tide is approximately 300 hectares. It contains a wide range of natural habitats which include inter tidal mudflats, salt marsh, freshwater marsh, dunes, and beach area. The mudflats support a large population of birds, at any time up to 27,000 birds are present, which gives the area the highest bird density in Ireland. The Island also provides the only Irish example of an undisturbed sequence of plant communities, from salt marsh to dune vegetation.
    · Customs House - Dublin City
    Located on the north side of the river Liffey at Customs House Quay. It is a fine example of Georgian building. It was destroyed during the war of Independence in 1921. It was designed by James Gandon. It is said that the 14 keystones of the building were to represent the Liffey "Anna Livia" the Atlantic Ocean and the other twelve to represent the main rivers of Ireland
    · Grafton Street - Dublin City
    Grafton street is heaven with coffee at 11 and a stroll round Stephens Green" or so the song goes. Surrounding Grafton street are many pubs and hotels made famous by Dublin's literary greats. McDaid's in Harry St, boasted Brendan Behan, Patrick Kavanagh and Flann O'Brien as regulars. Davy Byrne's Lounge, visited in James Joyce's "Ulysses" Duke St, Peter's Pub Johnson place, frequented by Brendan Behan's family. The Bailey, many literary associations with this pub. At the bottom of Grafton St, the Trinity end, you will find a monument to one of Dublin's best known characters "Molly Malone"
    · Moore Street Market - Dublin City
    An wonderful open market selling fruit, vegetables and meat. The Moore Street traders have fought vigorously to maintain their market. A great opportunity to meet some really remarkable Dublin characters.
    · O'Connell Street - Dublin City
    The sights along O'Connell Street include the General Post Office (GPO). Scene of intense fighting during the 1916 Rising. The building was reconstructed after the Rising. A statue of Cuchulainn is on display in the main area. Also along the street is Anna Livia, a monument in celebration of Dublin's life blood, The Liffey. Dubliners are well known for their subtle sense of humour have named it "The Floozy in the Jacuzzi" At the top of O'Connell St in Parnell St and just beyond the Rotunda Hospital you will find the Garden of Remembrance. A tribute to those who died in the War for Independence.
    · Stephens Green - Dublin City
    A favourite meeting place for the people of Dublin. It is a meeting place for students from nearby Trinity College, workers from the offices and shops that surround the park, tourists and shoppers from nearby Grafton St. It was originally a walled area with walks surrounding it. The area was levelled and walled in 1678 and a ditch dug round it. The four sides, each a quarter of a mile in length, were known as Leeson's Walk (S), French Walk (W), Beaux' Walk (N) and Monks's Walk (E).
    · Temple Bar - Dublin City
    Temple Bar is Dublin's Cultural quarter. First developed in the 19th Century, with narrow cobbled streets running close to the banks of the river Liffey, the area is full of character and charm. The streets are pedestrianised and to really appreciate all that Temple Bar has to offer, take time to stroll around. Ideally situated in the heart of the city centre, the area is a hive of activity where artists, designers and young entrepreneurs with creative ideas have set up small art galleries, cafes, theatres and colourful shops.
    · Trinity College - Dublin City
    Trinity College is the oldest university in Ireland. Founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, the College is in an enviable position in the very heart of Ireland's capital and in 1992 celebrated 400 years. The campus contains a unique collection of buildings dating from the 17th to the 20th century. The College is famed for the great treasures it has the honour to be guardian off. These include the BOOK OF KELLS, a 9th century illuminated manuscript, the books of Durrow and Armagh and an early Irish harp. These are displayed in The Colonnades exhibition Gallery and the Long Room which is the most impressive library in the College housing over 200,000 of Trinity's oldest books
    Heritage Sites
    · Casino Marino - Dublin City
    Casino is located at Marino, just off the Malahide Road and only 3 miles north of the centre of Dublin. It was designed by Sir William Chambers as a pleasure house for James Caulfeild, 1st Earl of Charlemont. It is one of the finest 18th century neo-classical buildings in Europe. The Casino, meaning "small house", surprisingly contains a total of 16 finely decorated rooms.
    · Kilmainham Gaol - Dublin City
    One of the largest unoccupied gaols in Europe, covering some of the most heroic and tragic events in Ireland's emergence as a modern nation from 1780s to the 1920s. Attractions include a major exhibition detailing the political and penal history of the prison and its restoration. The tour of the prison includes an audio-visual show.
    · Lusk Heritage Centre - Dublin City
    Lusk Heritage Centre comprises of a round tower, a medieval belfry and a 19th century church. They form a unit, although they were built over a period of almost a thousand years. The belfry now houses an exhibition on medieval churches of North County Dublin and also the magnificent 16th century effigy tomb of Sir Christopher Barnewall and his wife Marion Sharl.
    · Pearse Museum - Rathfarnam
    Located at Grange Road, Rathfarnam, the former school run by Patrick Pearse, now a museum in beautiful grounds. Attractions include exhibitions, a nature study room with attractive displays on Irish flora and fauna and an audio-visual show titled "This Man Kept a School".
    · Phoenix Park Visitor Centre - Dublin City
    A lively and entertaining exhibition on the history and the wildlife of the Phoenix Park is on display in the Visitor Centre. Here the visitor can enjoy a historical interpretation of the park from 3500 B.C. to the present day and can also view an audio-visual presentation on the Phoenix Park through the ages. Adjoining the Visitor Centre is the fully restored Ashtown Castle, a medieval tower house that probably dates from the 17th century.
    · Rathfarnham Castle - Rathfarnam
    The date of the foundation of the Castle is uncertain, but recent research would suggest 1583 as the most likely date. It was built by Adam Loftus, a Yorkshireman. The Castle has a colourful and interesting history with 18th century interiors by Sir William Chambers and James 'Athenian' Stuart and was declared a National Monument in the mid-1980s. The Castle is presented to visitors as a castle undergoing active conservation.
    · St. Mary's Abbey - Dublin City
    Located at Meetinghouse Lane, off Chapel Street, the Abbey was founded in 1139 as a daughter house of the Benedictine Order of Savigny but became Cistercian in 1147. It was, until its suppression in the 16th century, one of the largest and most important monasteries in Ireland. The Heritage Service along with the Dublin Archaeological Society and the History of Art Department of Trinity College, Dublin, have put together an interesting exhibition.
    · Waterways Visitor Centre - Dublin City
    A modern building constructed in the Grand Canal Basin, beside Pearse St. Bridge and the I.D.A. Enterprise Tower. The Centre houses an exhibition designed to introduce the visitor to the story of Ireland's Inland Waterways and the range and diversity of activities and experiences they offer. Attractions include an audio-visual show and working models, showing various engineering features, as well as an interactive multimedia presentation. Access for people with disabilities to ground floor.

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    Wicklow
    Entre al glorioso jardín de Irlanda
    Acurrucados entre las exuberantes colinas de Wicklow se encuentran bonitas cañadas, hermosas cascadas y lagos transparentes.
    Es con razón que a este condado lo llaman el “jardín de Irlanda”. Wicklow reluce con infinitos matices de verde y su espectacular paisaje proporciona un fondo perfecto para un montón de actividades al aire libre, incluyendo equitación, golf y senderismo.
    Además de su espectacular paisaje, recoletos pueblos y tramos de playas prístinas, Wicklow es un lugar histórico maravilloso con elegantes mansiones y jardines y un lugar monástico del siglo VI.
    ¿Lo sabía?
    Wicklow es una lugar de filmación de primera clase, y hay tres rutas cinematográficas que puede realizar en el condado, son la ruta Excalibur, la ruta Braveheart, y la ruta Michael Collins, que le llevarán por los lugares de filmación de estos tres records de taquilla.
    Main Tourist Attractions
    · Avoca Hand Weavers - Avoca
    Located in Avoca Village, Avoca Hand Weavers is the oldest working mill in Ireland today and dates from 1723. Visitors are welcome to watch the whole weaving process and to examine the yarns. The adjacent mill shop houses the complete Avoca range of clothing and a wide variety of the fine Irish crafts.
    · Avondale House and Forest Park - Avondale
    Built in 1779 by Samuel Hayes, based on a design by James Wyatt, Avondale House is set in the spectacular surroundings of Avondale Forest Park at Rathdrum. Now a museum to the memory of one of the greatest political leaders of modern Irish history, Charles Stewart Parnell, who was born in Avondale on 27th June, 1846. Parnell spent much of his time at Avondale until his death on 6 October 1891. The House has been refurbished to the decor of 1850 and a specially commissioned video has been produced to introduce visitors to Parnell and Avondale.
    · Glenroe Farm - Kilcoole
    Located at Kilcoole, as both a real and fictional rural community Glenroe Open Farm appeals to young and old alike. In addition to being one of the principal filming locations of popular TV series 'Glenroe', the Farm offers close and easy access to a terrific selection of farm animals and pets.
    · Mount Usher Gardens - Ashford
    Located at Ashford, Mount Usher Gardens are amongst the loveliest in the country. They combine a long time famous collection of plants, gathered from all corners of the world, with a romantic garden planted in the tradition of William Robinson. Informal paths wander along the river Vartry, across grassy expanses patterned with bulbs, and on through light woodland and groves of eucalyptus and magnolias. There are 20 acres of flowers, trees, shrubs and lawns laid out along the river Vartry, comprising of over 5000 different types of shrubs and plants.
    · National Sea Life Centre - Bray
    Located in Bray, the National Sea Life Centre hosts over twenty fascinating displays, housing more than one hundred different marine species. Exciting close encounters with marvels of marine life, from shrimps and sharks to octopus and eels are guaranteed.
    · Powerscourt Gardens - Enniskerry
    Located at Enniskerry, one of the worlds great gardens, Powerscourt Estate is situated twelve miles south of Dublin in the foothills of the Wicklow Mountains. The garden was begun in the 1740s and stretches out over 45 acres. It is a sublime blend of formal gardens, sweeping terraces, statuary and ornamental lakes together with secret hollows, rambling walks, walled gardens and over 200 variations of trees and shrubs.
    · Russborough House - Russborough
    Located at Blessington, Russborough House was built for Joseph Leeson, later Earl of Milltown, between 1740 and 1750. The architect was the German Richard Castle. Sir Alfred Beit bought Russborough in 1952 as a home for the Beit Collection of paintings. The collection is dominated by Dutch, Flemish and Spanish masterpieces, and includes English, Scottish, Italian and French paintings. The house, which is beautifully maintained, also contains fine furnitures, tapestries, carpets, porcelain, sliver and bronzes. The Maize is open every Sunday in July and August.
    · Wicklow's Historic Goal - Kilmantin Hill
    Located at Kilmantin Hill, Wicklow, this is a major new visitor attraction located in Wicklow town. There has been a Gaol on this site since 1702 and it remained active until 1924. During this time thousands of prisoners, young and old, men, women and children, guilty and innocent passed through its doors. The story of Wicklows Historic Gaol is their story. The exhibition covers such episodes as the 1798 rebellion, the famine, life in the gaol during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and transportation to the penal colonies of Australia.
    Heritage Sites
    · Dwyer McAllister Cottage - Derrynamuck
    The cottage nestles in the shade of Kaedeen mountain at the top of a grassy lane off the Donard to Rathdangan road in Co. Wicklow. It is a fine example of a traditional thatched cottage built with local stone and whitewashed inside and out. It was from this cottage, in the Winter of 1799, that the famed rebel, Michael Dwyer, fought the encircling British groups and finally made good his escape over the snow covered mountains. The cottage was later destroyed by fire and lay in ruins for almost 150 years. It was restored to its original form as a monument in the late 1940's and again extensively repaired and re-roofed in 1992.
    · Glendalough Visitor Centre - Bray
    Glendalough Visitor Centre, close to Bray, stands at the entrance to Glendalough Valley, just beside the main part of the monastic settlement. The monastery was founded in the sixth century by Saint Kevin and survived up until the sixteenth century. The buildings which survive date from between the eighth and the twelfth centuries and include a well preserved round tower, a number of fine stone churches and various crosses.
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    Wexford
    Pronto se rendirá ante la calidez y la belleza del soleado condado de Wexford
    Desde playas bañadas por el sol y preciosos pueblos costeros, como Courtown, Curracloe y Duncannon hasta la tranquila belleza del Arboreto John F Kennedy, Wexford transmite una sensación de calma a cada paso.
    Nada va demasiado rápido, no existen las prisas en este tranquilo rincón del soleado sureste de Irlanda. En vez de eso, el condado nos ofrece montones de pueblecitos pintorescos, una gran variedad de aves silvestres, fascinantes castillos y casas de campo, y por supuesto, el faro más antiguo del mundo, todavía en funcionamiento, en Hook Head.
    ¿Lo sabía?
    El Faro de Hook en el Condado de Wexford es el faro en funcionamiento más antiguo del mundo. La leyenda narra que Dubhan, un monje galés del siglo VI estableció el primer faro en Hook Head después de haberse desmayado tras la consternación de ver los cuerpos de los marineros muertos tras naufragar en las rocas.
    Main Tourist Attractions
    · Ballyhack Castle - Ballyhack
    Ballyhack Castle is situated on a steep slope overlooking Waterford estuary. The Castle, a large tower house, is thought to have been built in 1450 by the Knights Hospitallers of Saint John. The Knights were one of the two great military orders founded at the beginning of the twelfth century at the time of the crusades.
    · Berkeley Forest House Museum - New Ross
    Located at New Ross, Berkeley Forest Museum houses 18th and 19th Century toys, costumes, toy carriages, embroidered textiles and rare dolls - many of them from Irish families. The property is that of the family of George Berkeley, in whose honour the University of California is named. The fine collection is housed in the main rooms. A small pretty garden is included in the visit.
    · Duncannon Fort - Duncannon
    Duncannon Fort is star shaped and built at a strategically important promontory in Waterford Harbour. It was erected in 1588 in the expectation of an attack by the Spanish Armada. There had previously been a Celtic fort and a Norman castle on the site. The fort is noted for its dry moat, exterior walls and the legend of the croppy boy.
    · Hook Lighthouse - Churchtown
    Located opposite Churchtown, Hook Lighthouse was built in the thirteenth century as a navigation aid by William Marshal - Earl of Pembroke, as part of the development of his Lordship of Leinster. The massive structure has three stone vaulted chambers with a spiral stairway ascending through the thickness of the wall. According to tradition, a warning beacon was established at Hook Head in the sixth century by a Welsh monk named Dubhan, whose church still exists at nearby Churchtown. His successors were appointed custodians of Marshal's Tower and continued to keep the light for several centuries. Visitors to the oldest operational lighthouse in both Ireland and Great Britain will experience a journey through time from the story of the sixth century beacon up to present day light keeping.

    · John F. Kennedy Arboretum - New Ross
    Located at New Ross, the John F Kennedy Arboretum displays extensive collection of trees and shrubs from temperate regions of the world, dedicated to the memory of John Fitzgerald Kennedy. Arranged in botanical sequence, it covers 252 hectares of the Southern slopes and summit of Slieve Coillte. It includes 200 forest plots, rhododendrons, dwarf conifers, hedges, lake and viewing point.
    · Johnstown Castle - Johnstown
    Once owned by the Grogan family who were the biggest untitled landowners in Ireland. It was donated to the state after the death of the last resident Lady M Fitzgerald in 1942 on condition that it be used for agricultural education and research. The castle itself a gothic revival style masion is not open to the public but the wonderful 50 acre gardens are.
    · Maritime Museum - Kilmore Quay
    Located at Kilmore Quay, The Maritime Museum is housed on board the lightship Guillemot. There are two museums in one, since the lightship is the last Irish Lights vessel, complete with all its cabins (containing the original furniture, generations and fittings). It also houses many original and unusual artifacts. From the bridge desk both the book and the barrels lights can be seen, there are also excellent views of the Saltee Islands. Below deck there are model ships, a very extensive collection of pictures, and many sea antiques.
    · National Heritage Park - Ferrycarrig
    Located at Ferrycarrig, the National Heritage Park traces the habitation of man in Ireland, from the first settlers to the arrival of the Normans in the twelfth century. It demonstrates this through life size reconstruction of homesteads, burial modes and places of ritual. Your senses are sure to come alive with sites and sounds stretching back almost nine thousand years. Celtic Banquets are held on selected evenings where a lordly Celtic Chief fills vats with liquor, and prepares great quantities of food. Traditional Bards are also provided to entertain.
    · The Irish Agricultural Museum - Johnstown
    This Museum is located in the old farmyard buildings of Johnstown Castle, which were built about 1810. These have been restored and converted to provide facilities for Ireland's largest Agricultural Museum. There is also a new display of lawn and garden equipment. The exhibitions cover farm and rural transport, rural crafts, all the major farming activities as well as the activities on the farmyard and farm dwelling. A large permanent exhibition on the story of the potato and of the Great Famine of 1845-47 has recently opened.
    · Yola Farmsted Folk Park - Rosslare
    Located at Rosslare Harbour, Yola Folk Park rediscovers the delights of eighteenth century village life in Ireland, taking in a restored farmhouse and dining in the old world surroundings of Granny's Kitchen with its authentic open fire. Watch and listen as the wind drives the sails on one of the country's few working windmills. Call into the schoolhouse, the Kennedy House with its adjoining aviary and visit the lofted Kilmore Cottage.
    Heritage Sites
    · Ballyhack Castle - Ballyhack
    Ballyhack Castle is located on a steep slope in a commanding position overlooking Waterford estuary. The castle, a large tower house, is thought to have been built c. 1450 by the Knights Hospitallers of St. John, one of the two great military orders founded at the beginning of the 12th century at the time of the Crusades
    · Tintern Abbey - Saltmills
    Located at Saltmills, close to New Ross, Tintern is a Cistercian abbey, founded circa 1200 by William Earl of Marshal, and named after Tintern in Wales. The remains of the Abbey consist of the nave, chancel, tower, chapel and cloister. It was partly converted into living quarters after 1541, and further adapted over the centuries. Guided tours are available on request.

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